Edinburgh team v Cardiff – Simon Webster makes first start!

first_imgLATEST RUGBY WORLD MAGAZINE SUBSCRIPTION DEALS After three tough away Magners League games in the space of 12 days, Edinburgh aim to exploit home comforts to the full when they return to Murrayfield for the first time in six weeks to face Cardiff Blues on Friday night (kick-off 7.30pm). The match is interim head coach Nick Scrivener’s first in front of the capital crowd, who will share his determination to gain revenge for the 21-14 defeat sustained against the same opposition in Edinburgh’s last home fixture on January 22.Scrivener has made five changes to his team for a game he describes as a “vital opportunity to lay a marker for the rest of the season.”Up front, Edinburgh welcome back tight-head prop Geoff Cross, who came off the bench to win his third Scotland cap in the RBS 6 Nations Championship match against Ireland last Sunday.Esteban Lozada will line up in the second row alongside Steven Turnbull, while David Denton makes a first Magners League start for the club at blindside flanker. With Alan MacDonald and Roddy Grant both ruled out of this game through injury, Struan Dewar gets an Edinburgh debut at openside.In the backs, Simon Webster will make his first tournament start of the season on the wing.Scrivener confirmed: “Webbo has been fit and itching to get game-time for a couple of months now, but he’s had to show a degree of patience, mainly because of the form of our other wingers.“He deserves this chance to show he can sustain over a longer period the sort of lively showing we’ve seen from him off the bench of late.“The changes we’ve made in the pack are designed to see us get more from our front five. We want our big guys to really make an impact, particularly in contact, and the players we’ve brought in have the ability to do that.“As we’ve seen on a number of occasions in the last couple of months, Geoff Cross is really coming on as a ball carrier and offers excellent leg-drive.“Esteban Lozada is another who is at his most effective when focussed on his core role – being what you’d call a tight lock, hitting rucks, hitting opposition players and carrying the ball. He’s strong in the lineout in both an attacking and a defensive sense, and will complement Steven Turnbull well.“We’ve decided to give David Denton a start because of the size, desire and energy that he brings to the table. There’s no doubt that he’s a raw talent, but he’s first and foremost a talent, and we want to exploit the ability that he offers in the here and now while continuing to work on him.“I’ve been watching Struan closely with Heriot’s and the Scotland 7s team, and I’ve been impressed by his energy and all-round game. He’s confident on the ball and is a good link player. He’s also happy in the wider channels: he can offload and he can pass.”Scrivener has demanded that his players give a rugby-starved Edinburgh audience reason to get behind them from the off.He said: “It’s great to be playing in front of our own crowd after three games on the road, and we know we’ve got a responsibility to perform in a way that lifts them and makes clear the hurt we all feel about our recent results.“All three of the Cardiff games to date this year have been typical of our season: we’ve competed well in patches but not over the 80 minutes. We’re looking for consistency of performance, both within games and from week-to-week. That’s the challenge to the players over these last six games of the Magners League regular season.”Tickets for Friday’s game are available via www.edinburghrugby.org, by calling 0131 346 5180 or by visiting the Murrayfield Ticket Centre (just off Roseburn Street) in person.  Book by 5pm on Thursday and save £5 on the standard adult admission price.The Ticket Centre will be open from 9am on Friday for match-day sales and collections.EDINBURGH TEAM TO PLAY CARDIFF BLUES IN THE MAGNERS LEAGUE AT MURRAYFIELD ON FRIDAY 4 MARCH (KICK-OFF 7.30PM)15 Jim Thompson14 Simon Webster13 Ben Cairns12 James King 23 Andrew TurnbullNot considered due to injury: Alex Blair (back), Chris Bloomfield (ACL), Fraser Brown (neck, in post-surgery rehabilitation), Grant Gilchrist (ankle), Phil Godman (knee), Roddy Grant (knee), John Houston (knee), Gregor Hunter (groin), Lee Jones (ankle), Alan MacDonald (shoulder), Stuart McInally (hand), Fraser McKenzie (hip), Ross Rennie (toe). 11 Tim Visser10 David Blair9 Greig Laidlaw (CAPTAIN)1 Lewis Niven2 Andrew Kelly3 Geoff Cross4 Esteban Lozada5 Steven Turnbull6 David Denton8 Netani Talei7 Struan DewarSUBSTITUTES16 Alun Walker17 Kyle Traynor18 David Young19 Scott MacLeod20 Scott Newlands21 Ross Samson22 Tom Brown Video of the day thumbnail last_img read more

Aviva Premiership final: Five key areas

first_imgSo close: Ben Foden and his Northampton team-mates will be driving hard against Saracens this Saturday Power is the primary attribute that propelled these two brawny teams away from the chasing pack, and each possess flagship ball-carriers at the base of the scrum who can be destructive. Bully Vunipola is Saracens’ talismanic locomotive. Though Juan Smith and co. subdued him affectively, he still beat eight Toulon tacklers from 19 barreling runs – a staggering statistic. If Northampton do not stop Vunipola at source, they will endure a long, grim afternoon.Back in September, Sam Dickinson marauded out of the blocks and dragged Saints to a superb start. Racking up over 180 carries in the competition thus far, the former Rotherham skipper is a relentless workhorse who belongs in the top tier of domestic rugby in this country. However, his influence has waned slightly during recent weeks. Toulon exposed some cracks in the destroy-and-enjoy defence marshaled by Brad Barritt. If he can rouse himself once more, Dickinson could too.Peaking at the right time: SaintsEnginesEven to ardent Northampton fans, Tom Bullough, Marc Finney and Chris Hart might not be household names. That needs to change. Saints’ conditioners are doing a wonderful job and, even as a gruelling campaign enters a cramp-inducing home straight, they are making a difference.Tom Wood and Samu Manoa still look lively in the loose during the fourth quarter of energy-sapping encounters. Their set-piece gets stronger too. You can look beyond the last fortnight for proof. When the finalists last met in April at Allianz, the hosts led 28-10 with eight minutes remaining. Tries from Luther Burrell and George North left them hanging on at the end.That is not to say Saracens are sluggish at all. As the well-worn “wolf-pack” moniker suggests, Borthwick’s charges are experts at sensing weakness and clasping onto the jugular. Clermont and Harlequins, who shipped 20 second-half points on May 17, will testify as much. There is every chance of this Premiership season being up for grabs with seconds on the clock.Ball handling hooker: Saracens’ Schalk BritsWildcards Undoubtedly direct and abrasive, these sides do have their detractors. But to call them mechanical and unimaginative would be one-eyed. A combined total of 145 tries cannot have been manufactured by bludgeon alone. Northampton’s clever lineout, monitored by Courtney Lawes, is an abundant source of five-pointers, but Samoan scrum-half Khan Fotuali’i and full-back Ben Foden are unconventional, ambitious attackers. For Saracens, that role is performed by outstanding South African hooker Schalk Brits, who could easily occupy a spot in the midfield such are his outrageous talents. Alex Goode is intelligent on the counter as well, and has been responsible for many of the 19 scores plundered by Chris Ashton and David Strettle. McCall has encouraged freedom and a fast-paced off-loading style. It stalled on Saturday before Europe could be conquered. We will soon find out if it is good enough to take the Premiership.Find out what is in the latest edition of Rugby World here. You can have the magazine delivered to your home, or you can download the digital edition now! LATEST RUGBY WORLD MAGAZINE SUBSCRIPTION DEALScenter_img TAGS: Highlight Although Leicester and Harlequins contributed significantly to a pair of intense, exciting semis, there is little doubt that the cream has risen to the top of the Aviva Premiership. In terms of sheer consistency over an arduous nine-month campaign, Saracens and Northampton are worthy finalists. They deserve a chance to slug it out at Twickenham to determine the champions elect from an absorbing season.There will be some intriguing needle – from post-match singing to Chris Ashton’s transfer, there have been a few arguments down the years – and a titanic tussle lies in wait to determine the last man standing. But where will it be decided? Here are five areas.Getting the heads right: Steve Borthwick makes sure his team is relaxed before SaturdayMind-setThis is a starkly contrasting tale. The past week must have stung for Saracens, both emotionally and physically. Defeat to Toulon in Saturday’s Heineken Cup final was characterised by the Top 14 side’s superior muscle. That is tough to take for any professional outfit, let alone one as rugged and macho as Saracens. Pictures of a distraught Billy Vunipola slumped in the Millennium Stadium changing room spoke volumes – Mark McCall’s men were heartbroken. It won’t have been easy to dispel such deep-seated disappointment, though the prospect of handing outstanding captain Steve Borthwick a send-off to remember should serve as inspiration.Northampton enjoyed a far happier trip to Cardiff, defying a sluggish first half to overturn Bath and clinch the Amlin Challenge Cup. Following their phenomenal comeback that beat Tigers, it was the second time in seven days that a resurgent Saints stormed over the finishing line. Those sorts of performances – not to mention the glint of silverware – inject a sense of invincibility. Northampton’s motto last season was “Why not us?” This time round, it should be “Why anyone else?”Living to kick: Owen Farrell will pepper the posts in the finalSharpshootersGeorge Ford gave a 39-minute kicking clinic at the Arms Park on Friday evening, pinning corners and dissecting posts with aplomb in greasy conditions. Then on the stroke of half-time, he dragged a penalty to the left. It foreshadowed two more misses in a strangely panicky second period from the prodigiously talented 21 year-old. All the while, Stephen Myler plodded on.Points were calmly accrued from the tee and Northampton’s attack was directed without fuss. All of a sudden, the game was won. It felt neatly emblematic of Myler’s Test prospects – he has gone under the radar while punters have fawned over Danny Cipriani and other more eye-catching candidates. A quiet, classy, crucial cog in Jim Mallinder’s machine, the Northampton number ten has the temperament to deliver when the title is on the line.Then again, so does Owen Farrell. By far the most incisive Saracen during Saturday’s loss to Toulon, he is improving as a running threat all the time. A haul of 97 points in seven matches at Twickenham for club and country this season does not suggest someone who cowers on the big occasion, either.Bald ambition: Sam Dickinson will hope for final formGainline-busterslast_img read more

Saints and Sinners: The weekend’s talking points

first_img The SaintsThe Sting Wasps will take on Saracens in the European Champions Cup semi-finals on 23 April thanks to Jimmy Gopperth’s nerves of steel. The fly-half struck a final-kick conversion from five metres in from the right touchline to take his team to a 25-24 win over an Exeter Chiefs side who had led for most of the match.Goppeth had the chance to steal the glory thanks to Charles Piutau’s try which was set up by patient team-work. It was a remarkable comeback for Wasps as they were 24-11 down with just 16 minutes of the match to go, but they did not panic and showed extraordinary belief. They now have a shot at winning Europe’s top club competition for the third time. Plaudits also go to Matt Healy of Connacht, who created two tries for team-mate Niyi Adeolokun and scored one of his own, but the Irish side fell agonisingly short of grabbing a memorable win at Grenoble, losing 33-32.So close: Matt Healy scores for Connacht in France but ended up on the losing side. (Photo: Inpho)The SinnersLook after the ballOn big occasions against top opponents you have to take all your scoring chances and Northampton Saints wing Jamie Elliott wasted one during Saturday’s Champion’s Cup quarter-final against Saracens.Elliott darted down the left touchline, battering his way through one big hit, but as he reached forward to put the ball down over the line, Brad Barritt managed to get his right hand onto Elliott’s right arm and forced him to drop the ball. If Elliott had been carrying the ball in his left hand, away from the defenders covering across, he probably would have scored but as it was he missed a chance to put Northampton ahead.Elliott was not the only sinning Saint. With Northampton trailing 22-13 in the 77th minute, JJ Hanrahan threw out a wild pass when he was tackled inside his own 22 by Duncan Taylor as his team attempted to run from their own line. He should have taken the hit and recycled, as there were other Saints on hand to help, but his reckless offload was pounced on by Chris Wyles who scored a try to put Saracens well out of reach. TAGS: Highlight Dragon’s roar: Charlie Davies celebrates the Challenge Cup win at Gloucester. (Photo: Huw Evans Agency).Rising to the Challenge Charlie Davies is the toast of Wales today after his late try took Newport Gwent Dragons to their biggest ever European win as they beat Challenge Cup holders Gloucester 23-21 on their home patch.The replacement scrum-half spotted that Gareth Evans had left the door ever so slightly ajar by joining the side of a maul which the Dragons were driving towards the Gloucester line, and he went for the gap Evans had left in the line, dived over and scored a try which Dorian Jones converted to secure the win.A hat-trick of tries from Harlequins captain Danny Care played a big part in his side’s 38-30 Challenge Cup quarter-final win over London Irish. Quins were trailing 30-18 with 52 minutes gone but then created three tries from driving mauls and Care touched down at the back of two of them, having already scored an interception try in the first half.There were heroics on the losing side in the Challenge Cup from Sale Sharks centre Sam James, who scored a superb individual try in the last five minutes of the game against Montpellier. Trailing 25-14, the Sharks needed something a bit special and James’s chip and chase up the left fitted the bill, but Sale could not close the gap entirely and lost 25-19. Tim Visser gifted a try back to London Irish later in the half when he made a mess of tidying up a kick up the right and let the ball go lose and Fergus Mulchrone pounced to score.On a weekend when interception tries seemed to be all the rage, Toulon centre Maxime Mermoz saw his offload snaffled by Racing 92’s Juan Imhoff and the try the Argentine scored from there proved decisive in a game which ended in a 19-16 win for Racing and saw holders Toulon dumped out of the Champions Cup. That winning feeling: Jimmy Gopperth (front, centre) celebrates with his team-mates. (Photo: Inpho) Getting away with itHe ended up on the winning side, so Bradley Davies must be mighty relieved that the interception try he handed to Thomas Waldrom did not cost his Wasps team any dearer in their Champions Cup quarter-final against Exeter Chiefs.With 36 minutes gone and Exeter already 7-6 up, Wasps were in possession around their own ten-metre line when Davies had to turn 180 degrees to collect a wayward pass. As Brian O’Driscoll said on BT Sport after the game, “Don’t pass on a wayward pass.” Davies had obviously not heard that saying and with his back to play, he shifted the ball on and Waldrom appeared from over his shoulder to snaffle it and sprint for the line, sliding the last few metres to complete the score. With places in the European Champions Cup and Challenge Cup semi-finals at stake, there was everything to play for this weekend. Who rose to the occasion and who wilted under pressure? LATEST RUGBY WORLD MAGAZINE SUBSCRIPTION DEALS All’s well that end’s well: Tim Visser (centre) celebrates Harlequins’ win. (Photo: Getty Images)Too generous Brendan McKibbin made London Irish’s task of trying to win their Challenge Cup quarter-final at Harlequins all the harder by gifting a try to Danny Care after 20 minutes. From a lineout on half-way, he sent a long pass out, but Care had anticipated the plan and he sprinted round the back of the lineout, latched onto the ball and dashed in for a try which gave Harlequins the lead. Terrific Tigers Leicester were at their best as they trounced Stade Francais 41-13 at Welford Road in their Champions Cup quarter-final. Freddie Burns had a superb game for the Tigers, creating plenty of attacking chanced for his team-mates, scoring an interception try and thinking quickly to take an instant throw-in after a mistake by Djibril Camara close to his own line, which set up the easiest of tries for Manu Tuilagi.Man of the Match Peter Betham was also on top form, while Tigers wing Vereniki Goneva deserves a special mention, not only for scoring two tries but for unselfishly passing to blindside Michael Fitzgerald so he could score in the left-hand corner, when Goneva could have tried to power through to complete his hat-trick. With Leicester already 31-13 up, no one would have blamed Goneva if he had gone for glory and failed, but he did the best thing for his team and put Fitzgerald over.Winging in: Goneva scores his second try but denied himself a third. (Photo: Getty Images)Brad gets a grip Chris Ashton, Chris Wyles and Owen Farrell get the headlines for scoring Saracens’ points in their 29-20 Champions Cup win over Northampton Saints, but centre Brad Barritt also did a crucial piece of work to stop a score which might have given the Saints some early momentum.Saracens were 3-0 up in the 13th minute when Jamie Elliott looked set to score in the left-hand corner, but Barritt just managed to get hold of the Saint’s right arm as he reached down to ground the ball and he forced him to drop it. Referee Jeromes Garces disallowed the try, with help from the TV ref, and Northampton had missed out on a chance to make Saracens play catch-up.last_img read more

Olympics 2016: How rugby sevens took over the world

first_imgLATEST RUGBY WORLD MAGAZINE SUBSCRIPTION DEALS On the eve of the Olympic Games, Rugby World takes a look at the origins, current state and potential of the game of rugby sevens. This feature first appeared in the August 2016 issue of Rugby World magazine. RUGBY STANDS on the threshold. It’s a little woozy, perhaps even a little boozy, having celebrated a rude growth in fortunes in recent years both commercially and on the field, thanks to fine shows around the world. Domestic leagues continue to attract more fans, global stars cross national boundaries like cartographers with wanderlust, advertisers are booking up pitch hoardings in hordes, and all the while the little ticker in the corner tells us the viewing figures are going up.There have been high times thanks to World Cups, Test rugby and big domestic rivalries – and the party can get bigger. Certainly the traditional format of 15s is getting ever more ambitious, ever more eager to win you over.But that path is fairly certain. Right now it is not the traditional form of the game that is causing us to sway in the face of fresh opportunity, a little unsure of what is to come. No, no. It’s the more radical form of union – rugby sevens – that has dragged us to this moment…THE PASTThere was a time when 15s stood alone in the pantheon of union. But a Scottish butcher had a deviceful idea in 1883 that would set today’s events in motion. Ned Haig saw his club Melrose scrambling for cash and sought a solution. “Want of money made us rack our brains as to what was to be done to keep the club from going to the wall,” Haig said. “The idea struck me that a football tournament might prove attractive, but as it was hopeless to think of having several games in one afternoon with 15 players on each side, the teams were reduced to seven men.”‘The Sports’ stirred local imaginations, with six Borders clubs travelling to Melrose’s Greenyards ground – Kelso decided not to bother turning up – and battling for the first trophy, presented by “the ladies of Melrose”. Some 1,600 witnessed bitter rivals Melrose and Gala slog into extra-time for the cup and a new finals fell into folklore.Despite protestations after Melrose left the pitch early in extra-time, having taken the lead, the runners-up held their own tournament a year later. By 1908 a Scottish Borders sevens circuit existed – one that is still celebrated today.The game had a heartland but fittingly there was open space beyond. In 1926 the game crept across the border into England, where Scottish doctor JA Russell-Cargill helped start the Middlesex Sevens. In 1939 the Rosslyn Park Sevens began putting on competitions for schools – the latter still has tournaments in the same name.However, the first sevens tournament to be held off the UK’s shores was in 1921 and was hosted at Bosques de Palermo by the Buenos Aires Football Club (BAFC) on 3 July. The inter-club kickaround proved a hit and days later, during celebrations for Argentina’s Independence Day, another tournament was held between the club and local rivals. While it is true BAFC were made up of expats and first-generation Anglo-Argentinians educated abroad, it is a mystery how the game arrived.Simpler than 15s, it’s easy to see how sevens could be smuggled into new territories, but without advanced communications or even primitive marketing, like all sports it needed missionaries. Commonwealth nations were susceptible to sevens’ charms, as they already had the full-sided game, but a small boom was still needed. The time that became truly possible was the Seventies.The Scottish Rugby Union decided to celebrate their centenary in 1973 by putting on the first international sevens tournament. A mish-mash of household names from 15s took part. In the end prop Fran Cotton captained England to victory and some eyes turned to a rapid appeal. It was still a kickabout but one that could bewitch a different audience.Illustration by David LyttletonNothing can highlight this more than the Hong Kong Sevens – that famous cocktail of sport and sloshing revelry that has over the years relied on the tagline: ‘If you ever get bored of the sevens, you can always turn around and watch the rugby’. This social and sporting monster was birthed three years after the SRU’s shindig, as a Rothmans Tobacco exec and Hong Kong union bod spotted the marketing opportunity. It was here that players from Asia and the Pacific could converge on the colony and entertain. It was here that nations like Fiji could establish an identity – and an affinity with fans. The fact that Fiji have won the most iconic sevens tournament on 16 occasions, winning admirers every time, helps explain the magic of their relationship with sevens.This age of change allowed some to incubate a rugby culture away from their old colonial masters. Look at Kenya. According to Michael Kwambo, of the Kenya Rugby Union, the Mwamba club in Nairobi was created in 1977 to offer black athletes an avenue away from the white-dominated clubs. The same was true of Mean Machine RFC, set up the same year. A movement began – one that was about playing with physicality and panache but not in the style of the settlers. By 1982 the Watembezi Pacesetters touring team had been born, establishing a long-running relationship with the Dubai Sevens. From humble beginnings the game pushed out, though the first 15s World Cup in 1987 must have helped.By 1993 sevens had a World Cup too, notable for an Andrew Harriman-inspired England win in which Lawrence Dallaglio started, ten years before he would win a World Cup in the 15-a-side game. A hitch-kick, a blur of pace, rises and falls in trends and participation later, there have been six men’s Sevens World Cups.In 1997 there was the first global women’s sevens event, in Hong Kong. In 1998 men’s sevens had its first of five Commonwealth Games. The men’s Sevens World Series began in 1999. By 2009 the women had a World Cup, just as it was announced that sevens would enter the Olympics in 2016 and 2020. That same year global bank HSBC picked up the sponsorship of the men’s World Series. In 2011 the Women’s Sevens World Series began and by 2016 the men’s and women’s series came under the same umbrella with HSBC.Now that we’ve caught up…THE PRESENTWorld Rugby estimate they have increased their global playing base by 500,000 in the space of a year, taking them to around 7.7m players. Women’s rugby is the fastest-growing area, with approximately 35% of all players. An estimated £20m has been dished out by National Olympic Committees to unions. All sounds pretty rosy.This is at a time the men’s HSBC Sevens World Series has extended from nine legs to ten. During the 2015-16 season, stadium attendances increased to near 715,000 while broadcasters beamed out over 6,000 hours of footage to the masses too.A deal was struck before that season with HSBC, meaning a four-year extension of sponsorship for the men’s series, while taking on the sponsorship of the women’s series too. Then, on top of that, in April of this year e-commerce powerhouse Alibaba signed a ten-year deal with World Rugby which they hope can use sevens as a developmental tool within the world’s second-largest economy, China. Rugby World have been assured by the game’s custodians that the deal is the biggest-ever investment injection in the development of the sport.With the Olympics kicking off in August, the present is very exciting, if a little scary too. Sevens is guaranteed Olympic participation this year and again in 2020. Fail to be a hit and it may not be retained for 2024.Illustration by David LyttletonShooting the breeze in a suite outside the Hong Kong stadium, it’s clear key decision-makers feel that pressure. “It’s potentially the most important year in rugby union’s history,” says Giles Morgan, HSBC’s global head of sponsorship. “Off the back of a very successful Rugby World Cup, commercially in any case, the game is in a strong place. But the sport, through sevens, can go (into new territories). The Olympics gives you the opportunity to be in front of a global audience, but if we and World Rugby, all the unions and stakeholders don’t use the opportunity just before, during and, most importantly, after the event, then people will switch off. It’s a great game, very entertaining, easy to understand – all the things we love about sevens – but we’ve got to then capitalise on that.”From a purely marketing point of view, this year is huge. The short game has become more and more professional, although there are still disparities between the richest nations and the pauper unions, but there is a growing sense that a talent gap is closing globally – albeit much quicker and more noticeably in the men’s game – as the list of teams who can win tournaments grows. With investment, lesser lights can shine brighter. Twin that with rich outliers cottoning on to the game’s attractions and it’s enough to make you rub your hands. On these markets, Morgan leans forward.“Clearly China is important because they invest so much in the Olympic movement, but I feel America is more important in the short term. The TV audience for the Olympics is colossal in the US, particularly with the NBC deal which does the broadcasting, but also because the time zone with Rio means it’s going to be good for US viewers. I’m delighted the US team genuinely are a strong sevens side. So the ingredients are there. The dream final for the men would be Fiji versus USA. Fiji having never won an (Olympic) medal and being one of sevens’ great teams, and the USA with its audience.”That is certainly something USA coach Mike Friday would be delighted to hear. Having left English rugby in 2006 to work in the City of London, Friday returned to the sport in 2012 to coach Kenya. When asked what had changed in that time, in terms of rugby ability, he chuckles.“People said to me, ‘The game’s changed, you’ll be old school.’ I thought, ‘Let’s see’. It is still about pass, catch, run, tackle. It’s about the basics of the game and being able to execute under pressure or fatigue – your core skills have to stand up under duress. That part hasn’t changed. The bit that’s evolved is the conditioning levels, and what’s expected in terms of power and physicality has gone through the roof. If you haven’t got the engine or the willingness to go to dark places, you won’t be a success in sevens. For an aspiring country, if they can get their conditioning right and work on technique, then start to understand the rugby intelligence part of it, they have a recipe to compete.” Okay. So what about Rio?“Everyone recognises it’s so important. It’s difficult in Rio as it’s 12 teams, not 16 (like a World Series event). But that doesn’t mean it won’t be an exciting event. We want games going to the wire, we want upsets and all nations being able to win a medal – and that’s very much a possibility. Yes, everyone sees Fiji and New Zealand, Australia and South Africa as favourites, but my team can turn any of them over. Get out of your group, it’s the quarters. Win that, you’re one away from a final and it’s squeaky bum time! It will be truly mouth-watering.”That is a belief held by the athletes. Some names from the men’s and women’s series have been heard in the press with increased frequency. But much coverage has revolved around ‘converts’ – Kiwi Sonny Bill Williams had a season to catch up with the game’s greats, while Aussie Quade Cooper fell by the wayside in his own attempt to go from 15s to sevens. Countless headlines worldwide were dedicated to NFL star Nate Ebner’s return to the game in which he represented the US as a teen and Aussie league phenomenon/one-season NFL player Jarryd Hayne’s late bolt for Fijian inclusion. A gold medal is a hell of a draw. Just ask South African Ryan Kankowski. “I was talking to Gary Gold at the Sharks (Super Rugby 15s franchise) about a three-year deal,” says the 20-cap Springbok back-rower, “and the sevens option, coming into the Olympics, came up. It was once in a lifetime. I started my career in sevens, enjoyed a good running brand of rugby. Over the years that whole ‘bigger is better’ mentality has come in to 15s. I’m not a basher. Maybe I’m back to my roots.“But it’s hard. I lost nine kilos in a few legs of the series. Sevens is just ridiculous! You can’t just come in and think it’s going to happen. In 15s you get around jogging. Yes, you work hard at times but there’s time to rest. In sevens you can’t. And you don’t want to come in a month before. You owe it to the team to give it a good shot, which is why I have given it six months.”There’s the rub. Kankowski missed out on Olympic selection. Rugby sevens is a sport that boasts incredible athletes, honed over time for a game that now demands particular attributes. Some have noticed Australia’s women’s team of code-hoppers and touch players, but they have been hand-picked as part of a system. If the Games opens a door for more stars from other sports, they must be handled well. Like so much else.It is something Friday chimes in with again. “It is all about what happens after the Olympics. What do World Rugby do to ensure that we make the most of the springboard? Do we get a second-tier men’s competition, enlarge the women’s championship, get a second tier there? Do we invest in the game around the globe? Then suddenly 2020 is even more competitive, because in Russia it goes into the curriculum. It’s the same with China – 2016 was probably too early for their kids, but in 2020, now we’re talking contenders. It’s big for North America. Get it in high schools and use it to complement American Football. Suddenly we have a credible alternative to the NBA, NFL or wrestling.”Once more we return to the idea of planning for the future. An HSBC report released this year assessing the landscape also makes seven bold claims for the game of sevens in ten years’ time – that Tier Two and Three nations grow in stature; that ‘Big Bash’ cricket-style sevens tournaments become possible; that World Rugby’s 7.7m players double; that 40% of players worldwide will be female; that tech innovation will make the game even more attractive; that social platforms will overtake websites in the fight for our attentions; and that the game itself will dominate a space in the sporting calendar, generating rivalries and revenue streams.With these, if we drill down into the predictions and the hopes, what can we truly foresee?Illustration by David LyttletonTHE FUTUREThere is something reassuring about the words from the other end of the line. Gary Quinn, vice-president of programming at NBC Sports in the US, is explaining his love of sevens and it feels heart-warmingly genuine.“If you’d told me ten years ago I’d be waking up at 5am to watch rugby, I’d say you were nuts!” he laughs. Rugby came on NBC’s radar when it became an Olympic sport. The Collegiate Rugby Championship has been televised too, and although it has been propped up to an extent by dedicated sponsorship, 2015’s edition averaged 615,000 viewers in its two NBC airings – a 7% increase from the 2014 contest, while viewing of the event on NBC Sports Network was up 27% in 2015. Quinn explains that NBC have also identified a window of opportunity to broadcast live sports – the lifeblood of any network – early on Saturday and Sunday mornings, thanks to the fierce popularity of English Premier League football. Their recent deal with Premiership Rugby means if there’s a black hole on those mornings, they can drop in intense club rugby.Then there’s the series. The USA Sevens airings have a steady return, while NBC’s most-watched telecast to date was in January 2014, with 1.23m watching the Las Vegas finals.If some predictions come true and new events sprout up on new platforms, perhaps with a flashy, Big Bash-style tournament, how likely would it be to get on US TV screens?“It hasn’t been easy and we’ve had our challenges with rugby. You have to sell sponsorship and have viewers. The question is, ‘Does it match other programming content?’,” says Quinn.“We’d be cautious of new platforms being developed – we’d need more proof in the pudding. We’re always looking at strategy. We’ve fallen in love with sevens but it’s how it performs with year-round coverage. We’re confident it can grow but it needs help. We’d be looking for the reception after the Olympics.”Of course, one broadcaster has club sevens already on their plate. The Singha Sevens is broadcast on BT Sport, and according to Josh Smith, the commercial director for their rights portfolio, the sevens is a happy bonus to come with their Aviva Premiership coverage. But viewing figures year to year depend on a “number of moving parts” – chiefly what else is on at the time.Cricket’s IPL, Smith says, is anchored in a domestic setting. It has a set place on the calendar and a buy-in from big names in other cricket formats. So do current seven stars see that sort of event coming into sevens?Trying to relax on a couch at the reception of a heaving Twickenham Stadium in London, New Zealand Sevens captain Scott Curry considers breakaway tournaments.“It’s definitely possible. Purely because some teams still aren’t getting paid very much at all to compete on the world stage. Some are really well looked after – ourselves, South Africa and England, for example – but some are still very amateur in how they are looked after. So if there was an IPL-style tournament it would get a lot of attention from players. It potentially could keep sevens talent in sevens too, and in a weird way it would be good for the game. It could stop guys from getting a contract to play 15s somewhere which can be too good to turn down. It could also offer a bit more security.”For Curry, welfare must come into any thinking. “It’s a massive issue. Because sevens is so young and starting to ramp up, professionally and commercially, it’s about getting the balance between the player welfare and commercial side. The last series went from nine tournaments in seven months to ten tournaments in five. It’s just about getting that balance right. But if World Rugby get that right, we’ll be sweet.“We’re getting there in terms of giving players a voice. Player reps meet up maybe a couple of times a year to voice our concerns, about what’s good about the tournaments and what’s not so good – how can we make it better for the players? I think we’re getting there.”Illustration by David LyttletonCurry is optimistic. He has signed on to remain with NZ Sevens well beyond Rio. Retired but commenting now is English hero Maggie Alphonsi, who is optimistic too. She competed in the first Women’s Sevens World Cup in 2009 and says the women’s game has come on hugely technically since then, with a prime indicator being the falling number of passes it takes to get the ball from one touchline to the other. But it’s also grown commercially and in terms of media coverage. The prediction from HSBC for women’s numbers swelling relies on current conditions for growth to be replicated every year for ten years. All must stay perfect.“There has been so much change but now there needs to be more investment in the grass roots,” says Alphonsi. “I was in Kenya recently and there are some fantastic players there. But they need more coaches, volunteers.“The great thing is that we’re now starting to hear more women speak about women’s rugby. There are strong role models – Sarah Goss, Jen Kish, Emily Scarratt – who have voices and opinions. It’s important that women are heard talking about the women’s game.”Certainly it’s something HSBC and World Rugby are aware of. After Rio, World Rugby will be pushing for big changes according to Mark Egan, the head of competitions and performance. “The priority is to get the Women’s Series right, at World Series level, with at least six tournaments and then try to grow a men’s second-tier series around the men’s series, feeding into a qualification process for that series. So in two years’ time, I’d love to see three or four Tier Two tournaments sitting below the World Series, then six really good women’s tournaments, and to start building more cross-regional women’s events. So it’ll have to be a four-year plan leading into Tokyo 2020 or coming into a new cycle for the World Series in 2019.”The blueprint is there. The bells and whistles can come after – computer games, tech, new competitions sold off the back of long-established sevens stars and complemented by converts. What is important is that after a first Olympic Games showing for sevens, what the sport already represents becomes stronger.center_img Illustration by David Lyttleton For a glorious six days this summer, sevens will own rugby. It is where we go from here that matters now. Will the game of rugby cross that next threshold?This feature first appeared in the August 2016 issue of Rugby World. To subscribe to the magazine, check out our latest deal here.last_img read more

Rugby World Cup 2019 Travel Guide: Fuji

first_imgLATEST RUGBY WORLD MAGAZINE SUBSCRIPTION DEALS Jump to it: Bungy over Sudogawa Valley fujisan-kkb.jp/englishWORLD CUP VISITWhile Fuji is not a host city, Shizuoka is a host prefecture – the nearest venue is Ecopa Stadium, where four matches are being played – and it offers you the chance to take in a unique view of Mount Fuji.Related: Rugby World Cup 2019 venuesGETTING THEREYou can take a bullet train from Tokyo to Shin-Fuji Station in only one hour.Flaming: The Karigane Festival coincides with the World CupDID YOU KNOW? There are four routes to climb Mount Fuji – three from the Shizuoka Prefecture and one from the Yamanashi Prefecture – but the official mountain-climbing season lasts only two months, from 10 July to 10 September. You can go up earlier or later than that, but it is advised that only experienced climbers do so. TAGS: Japan Beautiful blooms, bright flames and a bungy jump are all here TOP TIPThe World Cup coincides with the Karigane Festival, which is held on 6 October every year and involves lots of flames, so see if the timings work and you can incorporate it into your trip. Advertising FeatureRugby World Cup 2019 Travel Guide: FujiSEEA coastal city at the foot of Mount Fuji, this is the only place in Japan where you can see the iconic Japanese peak right from sea level to the summit. You can see Mount Fuji from anywhere in the city so you’re sure to spend lots of time admiring it, especially during sunrises and sunsets when so many different colours come into play.Head to Karigane embankment to see fields of cosmos flowers. They are described as the cherry blossoms of autumn and the pink, white, orange and yellow flowers are usually in bloom until the end of September.DOFor the thrill-seekers amongst you, you can do a 54-metre bungy jump over the Sudogawa Valley in the Ashitaka mountain range, where you’ll also be able to view nearby waterfalls and Fuji’s cityscape.Or if you fancy something more relaxing, stroll around the Yoshiwara district in the east of the city, where buildings modern and traditional combine.Local speciality: Tsuke NapolitanEATFuji’s speciality dish is tsuke Napolitan, which translates as dipping Neapolitan – think a blend of Japanese and Italian. It’s spaghetti served with a tomato dipping sauce and different restaurants have their own versions. The city’s location also means there is an abundance of fresh seafood from Suruga Bay.TOURIST WEBSITElast_img read more

Watch: La Rochelle fans give team incredible Champions Cup send-off

first_imgThe club’s fans went all out, outside the airport “Yeah, I’ve known of Rog, he’s a legend of the game. I didn’t know how he’d go as a coach though, because it doesn’t always transfer being a great player to a great coach, but for me, he’s been awesome. He’s been someone who has helped on the side of playing to your strengths.“Having a coach like that, he’s never been down on me or never comes down hard on the boys. It’s the little stuff, I remember one of our first games against Toulouse and he ripped into me and Lopeti Timani and it was a wake-up call that I’d probably been saying in my head. 3 things about @RonanOGara10 1.he’s a world class coach & may bring glory to La Rochelle on Saturday2. he’s a massive movie star & @BrianODriscoll is a big fan of his work(he said his dream is to act with ROG one day)3. he’s got a new movie out! @SimonZebo @offtheball pic.twitter.com/dgwNTdUXFy— Steven Connolly Impressions (@StevenPConnolly) May 20, 2021“Me and the boys, we’ve got the old Rugby 08 up on the PS2 in the team room and we often play off Ireland and put Rog on the pitch, with his 95 or 99 rating or something. La masterclass de Will Skelton face au Leinster ( : Champions Cup) #SRvLEI #StadeRochelais #Rugby pic.twitter.com/LCiU69LjEg— Top Rugby (@TopRugby2) May 4, 2021“But then to hear it from one of the head honchos, him and Jono, was an eye-opener and that’s the best type of coach, he’s direct, he’s straight and I enjoy it.“I think him and (director of rugby) Jono Gibbes have been great with the direction in how we want to play, they haven’t pigeon-holed us into a specific style but let us play to our strengths.“Ronan and Jono facilitate that at training and it’s showing on the field.” Grosse ambiance à l’aéroport de La Rochelle pour encourager le @staderochelais ! pic.twitter.com/b0580du8Ay— France Bleu La Rochelle (@Bleu_Rochelle) May 20, 2021La Rochelle face Toulouse at Twickenham on Saturday 22 May at 4.45pm – with the latter looking for a record fifth European Cup win.Can the support behind La Rochelle give them the belief they can win? The above is a sight many rugby clubs will be jealous of and one that speaks to a sense of civic pride and what it means to identify with your rugby club.One player highlighted as vital to La Rochelle’s chances on Saturday is giant Aussie lock Will Skelton – and while so much focus has been on the side’s playing style and the quality of coaching at the club, Skelton has revealed something else about about La Rochelle coach Ronan O’Gara. How about this from the La Rochelle fans, giving their team an incredible send-off as they head for London and a Champions Cup final showdown with Gallic rivals Toulouse. Can’t get to the shops? You can download the digital edition of Rugby World straight to your tablet or subscribe to the print edition to get the magazine delivered to your door.Follow Rugby World on Facebook, Instagram and Twitter. LATEST RUGBY WORLD MAGAZINE SUBSCRIPTION DEALS The club’s faithful outside the airport (Twitter) last_img read more

East Coast grinds toward recovery following Hurricane Sandy

first_img Priest Associate or Director of Adult Ministries Greenville, SC By Lynette WilsonPosted Nov 1, 2012 Youth Minister Lorton, VA Seminary of the Southwest announces appointment of two new full time faculty members Seminary of the Southwest Rector Pittsburgh, PA Press Release Service Comments (5) Donn Mitchell says: Episcopal Migration Ministries’ Virtual Prayer Vigil for World Refugee Day Facebook Live Prayer Vigil June 20 @ 7 p.m. ET TryTank Experimental Lab and York St. John University of England Launch Survey to Study the Impact of Covid-19 on the Episcopal Church TryTank Experimental Lab Assistant/Associate Rector Washington, DC Rector and Chaplain Eugene, OR Rector Bath, NC Comments are closed. Rector Albany, NY Assistant/Associate Rector Morristown, NJ November 2, 2012 at 10:32 am I hope that the dioceses and parishes outside of the area affected by hurricane Sandy are doing more than offering prayers of support. This is a national disaster on a scale that is still not totally apprehended. Our Episcopal brothers and sisters in this area need help along with all the other affected souls: Christian and non-Christian. The Church Pension Fund Invests $20 Million in Impact Investment Fund Designed to Preserve Workforce Housing Communities Nationwide Church Pension Group Featured Events Rector Knoxville, TN Barbara Reynolds says: Rector Collierville, TN Inaugural Diocesan Feast Day Celebrating Juneteenth San Francisco, CA (and livestream) June 19 @ 2 p.m. PT Matthew Welch says: Hurricane Sandy AddThis Sharing ButtonsShare to PrintFriendlyPrintFriendlyShare to FacebookFacebookShare to TwitterTwitterShare to EmailEmailShare to MoreAddThis Rector Martinsville, VA Rector/Priest in Charge (PT) Lisbon, ME Jon Threlkeld says: Submit an Event Listing Bishop Diocesan Springfield, IL Submit a Press Release This Summer’s Anti-Racism Training Online Course (Diocese of New Jersey) June 18-July 16 In-person Retreat: Thanksgiving Trinity Retreat Center (West Cornwall, CT) Nov. 24-28 Episcopal Charities of the Diocese of New York Hires Reverend Kevin W. VanHook, II as Executive Director Episcopal Charities of the Diocese of New York An Evening with Presiding Bishop Curry and Iconographer Kelly Latimore Episcopal Migration Ministries via Zoom June 23 @ 6 p.m. ET November 2, 2012 at 3:31 pm General Seminary received some minor flooding and, as of Friday, is still without power. But the community has remained close and is taking care of one another. Classes have been cancelled until next Monday. 815 is doing just fine.– A GTS student Tags New Berrigan Book With Episcopal Roots Cascade Books center_img Virtual Episcopal Latino Ministry Competency Course Online Course Aug. 9-13 Rector Smithfield, NC Rector Belleville, IL November 5, 2012 at 12:14 pm Has a request been sent to all the churches with requests for money and items needed by those who have been effected by the hurricane. I was not happy with what happened in Haiti and the amount of help/money that was wasted. I need to know how the church is going to be directly involved with the relief effort. I have seen too much waste administratively by the Red Cross. I want to help, but need to know who will be the steward of my money. Barbara Reynolds, Cookeville, TN Associate Rector for Family Ministries Anchorage, AK The Church Investment Group Commends the Taskforce on the Theology of Money on its report, The Theology of Money and Investing as Doing Theology Church Investment Group Join the Episcopal Diocese of Texas in Celebrating the Pauli Murray Feast Online Worship Service June 27 Associate Priest for Pastoral Care New York, NY Debris litter the beach at Casino Pier three days after Hurricane Sandy came ashore in Seaside Heights, New Jersey, Nov. 1. REUTERS/Steve Nesius[Episcopal News Service] Updated Nov. 2 at 12:18 p.m. EDT to include information about the dioceses of New York and the Dominican Republic and the church in Cuba. Dioceses throughout New York, New Jersey and Connecticut continued to assess the damage and havoc caused by Hurricane Sandy as the region made slow progress toward recovery on Nov. 1.Large sections of the three states remained without power Nov. 1, many of them losing power in advance of the Oct. 29 “superstorm”, and reports of damage and power outages continued to trickle in.The Diocese of Newark reopened its offices Thursday, keeping regular business hours.“We feel like we really were spared,” said Nina Nicholson, the diocese’s director of communications and technology, in a phone call with ENS. She added that to the best of her knowledge none of the diocese’s members were injured and the damage was much less than was expected.All Saints Episcopal Parish in Hoboken, one of the region’s hardest hit areas, suffered damage to its Jubilee Building, taking on at least five to seven feet of water. The parish itself was spared any damage. And at St. Mary’s in Sparta, a tree fell on the parish’s memorial garden. Otherwise, Nicholson said, the diocese has received reports of downed trees, smashed gutters, air conditioners knocked out of windows, and continued power outages.At least five Newark churches have power and Wi-Fi service and have opened their doors to community members:St. Paul’s in Chatham (200 Main St., 973-635-8085)St Paul’s in Englewood (113 Engle St., 201-568-3276)St. James’ in Montclair (581 Valley Road at the corner of Bellevue Avenue, 973-744-0270)St. Luke’s in Montclair (73 South Fullerton Ave., 973-744-6220)Calvary Church in Summit (31 Woodland Ave. 908-277-1814)The Diocese of New Jersey’s Canon to the Ordinary John Sosnowski, in a message posted Oct. 31 on the diocesan website, urged members to join its Facebook page to keep track of and respond to needs as they surface.“We have received offers of assistance from churches that would like to help. We urge you to utilize the Facebook page to create connections among your churches and to notify each other about any immediate needs of which you become aware. By creating these linkages, one church may be able to respond to another’s need in a more timely way rather than communicating through Diocesan House,” he said in his message.Those in the Diocese of New Jersey needing assistance on a larger scale have been asked to contact Episcopal Relief & Development.The Diocese of Long Island last posted an update at 10:25 a.m. on Oct. 31, stating that damage to the diocese continued to be minor, with All Saints in Great Neck, on Long Island’s north shore, losing its new signs and a fallen tree on St. Paul’s, also in Great Neck, causing the church to lose a roof gutter. The damage to the two churches in Great Neck is in addition to previously reported damage to the columbarium at St. Bede’s in Syosset.The diocesan campus suffered extensive “tree fall” and continues to be without electricity, according to the update.Katie Mears, Episcopal Relief and Development’s program manager for U.S. Disaster Preparedness and Response, and New York Bishop Coadjutor Andrew Dietsche, were are meeting with impacted clergy from the Diocese of New York on Nov. 1 “to share information, coordinate resources and identify areas of significant need,” according to an update posted to Episcopal Relief & Development’s website.Mears has also been working with Diocesan Disaster Coordinators in the dioceses of Long Island, New Jersey and Newark, the update said.(Diocesan Disaster Coordinators are appointed by their bishop to act as the liaison between Episcopal Relief & Development and diocesan leadership, and to encourage and assist the diocese and its congregations in disaster preparedness planning and response.)In the Diocese of New York, depending on the region, members are asked to contact the diocese’s disaster coordinator, the Rev. Stephen Harding, and in the mid-Hudson region, Val Stelcen.In a Nov. 2 voice mail message Harding said Staten Island and Region 2 were particularly hard hit, with many downed trees, but so far the diocese has not received reports of catastrophic structural damage.They have put a system in place to respond locally, with people in the mid-Hudson region helping those in Region 2.And St. Mark’s Church in the Bowery was to open its doors Nov. 2 from 10 a.m. to 4 p.m. to provide food and water; staffed by church volunteers from above 34th Street.Diocese of Connecticut Bishop Ian Douglas is in Auckland, New Zealand, attending the Anglican Consultative Council meeting, but is keeping in touch with the diocese by phone. Bishops Suffragan James Curry and Laura Ahrens have been checking in with parishes, said Karin Hamilton, canon for communication and media, in a telephone call with ENS from her office.In a message to the diocese, Connecticut’s bishops said: “This terrible storm has created great hardship in many of our cities and towns, among our clergy and parishioners as well as our friends and neighbors. In our response to their needs, in prayer and action, we can be agents of God’s mission in the wider community. In this time of recovery we would love to be in conversation with parishes and deaneries about how our church can serve the areas that have been harmed. We are partners with Episcopal Relief & Development’s U.S. Disaster Response and they have resources that we can tap into and deploy to help our neighborhoods recover.”There’s been some damage, “but not great damage that can’t be prepared,” said Curry in a telephone call. “What we are gearing up for is how can we be of service to the greater community.”Since making landfall near Atlantic City, New Jersey, on Oct. 29 Sandy has claimed the lives of more than 56 people in the United States and one in Canada, in addition to at least 74 people who lost their lives when Sandy barreled through the Caribbean.Episcopal Relief & Development has also been in touch with the Episcopal Diocese of Haiti, where damage from Hurricane Sandy appears to exceed that from Hurricane Isaac in late August. Agricultural regions in the southern part of the country were especially hard-hit, leading to concerns about high prices and potential shortages of fresh food. The diocese is conducting needs assessments in impacted areas and continues to receive reports from local clergy, helping to inform the response plans currently in development.The Diocese of Jamaica, Church in the Province of the West Indies (CPWI), has also suffered extensive damage and are currently in the process of assessing the damage, said the Rev. Glenda McQueen, the Episcopal Church’s officer for Latin America and the Caribbean, in an e-mail message to ENS on Nov. 1.The Dominican Republic suffered widespread flooding and some 300 people have sought shelter in Episcopal Diocese of the Dominican Republic churches in   and Cuba was hard hit on the eastern side of the Island, confirmed Bishop Wilfrido Ramos-Orench, the Episcopal Church’s officer for Province 9, in an e-mail to ENS on Nov. 2.In a Nov. 1 statement from Washington National Cathedral, the Very Rev. Gary Hall, said: “We thank God for the meteorologists whose foresight and dedication prevented this unprecedented weather from coming as a surprise. We also offer prayers of gratitude for those whose service has eased suffering and will continue to do so, especially in the most hard-hit regions of New York and New Jersey, over the coming weeks.“In this period when the universal church honors all saints and all souls, the more than 100 individuals who have died from this storm are on our minds and will be in our prayers,” Hall added. “Their deaths make clear the importance of stable infrastructure and the risks of unstable climate. Honoring their lives, and following the example of so many who helped our country through this trying time, let us strive to find stability and direction in whatever new storms our society and planet may face. May we also render continued praise and thanks to God for all the people and places that matter to us, reaffirming a will to share the talents God has invested, in us, through them.”— Lynette Wilson is an editor/reporter for the Episcopal News Service.  Associate Rector Columbus, GA Canon for Family Ministry Jackson, MS Director of Administration & Finance Atlanta, GA November 1, 2012 at 5:45 pm What about General Seminary and 815? General must surely have been hard hit. Cathedral Dean Boise, ID Missioner for Disaster Resilience Sacramento, CA Curate Diocese of Nebraska Ya no son extranjeros: Un diálogo acerca de inmigración Una conversación de Zoom June 22 @ 7 p.m. ET Featured Jobs & Calls Rector Hopkinsville, KY An Evening with Aliya Cycon Playing the Oud Lancaster, PA (and streaming online) July 3 @ 7 p.m. ET Curate (Associate & Priest-in-Charge) Traverse City, MI Rector Shreveport, LA November 1, 2012 at 6:23 pm Thank you, Lynette, for this report. I am so pleased to see that our primary concern is not buildings but people and communities and how churches are reaching out into the community. I would love to hear and/or see pictures of bishops who want their dioceses to be ‘missional’ with their people – sleeves rolled up – doing whatever needs to be done. If ‘missional dioceses’ are led by ‘missional bishops’. Please post these stories/ pictures when / if you get them. Episcopal Church releases new prayer book translations into Spanish and French, solicits feedback Episcopal Church Office of Public Affairs Rector (FT or PT) Indian River, MI East Coast grinds toward recovery following Hurricane Sandy Haiti, Jamaica hard hit Course Director Jerusalem, Israel Family Ministry Coordinator Baton Rouge, LA Rector Tampa, FL Virtual Celebration of the Jerusalem Princess Basma Center Zoom Conversation June 19 @ 12 p.m. ET Remember Holy Land Christians on Jerusalem Sunday, June 20 American Friends of the Episcopal Diocese of Jerusalem Rector Washington, DC Submit a Job Listing Priest-in-Charge Lebanon, OH the Rev’d Dr. Elizabeth Kaeton says: Assistant/Associate Priest Scottsdale, AZ Director of Music Morristown, NJ last_img read more

Houston Cathedral hosts Friends of Iman Interfaith Iftaar

first_imgHouston Cathedral hosts Friends of Iman Interfaith Iftaar Remember Holy Land Christians on Jerusalem Sunday, June 20 American Friends of the Episcopal Diocese of Jerusalem This Summer’s Anti-Racism Training Online Course (Diocese of New Jersey) June 18-July 16 View the photo gallery[Episcopal Diocese of Texas] Christ Church Cathedral in Houston hosted an interfaith Iftaar on July 11, presented by the Friends of Iman, a group of young adults who organize education and interfaith activities in memory of Iman Haq, a young Muslim woman who died two years ago at the age of 20.An Iftaar is a traditional Islamic dinner observed during the month of Ramadan, when the community gathers together to break their daylong fast as the sun goes down.The event featured a panel discussion with representatives from the three Abrahamic faiths: Mubeen Khumawala representing Islam, Rabbi Steve Gross representing Judaism, and the Very Rev. Barkley Thompson, dean of the cathedral, representing Christianity. As the event was focused on the observance of Ramadan, an Islamic month of fasting, each representative spoke briefly on the fasting rituals of their faith tradition before taking questions from the crowd.Khumawala explained that many Islamic rituals can be traced to the idea of self-purification.“We attain self-purification through fasting by restraining yourself from your two most basic needs: food and drink,” he said. “Fasting during the month of Ramadan serves a means of remembrance…We remember God to attain self-purification by reciting his word, through supplicating to him and by keeping our minds and our tongues busy with this remembrance.”According to Gross, the Jewish tradition focuses on the idea of atonement on Yom Kippur, which is the culmination of 10 days of repentance. “The holiday, or holy day, of Yom Kippur enables us to really try to focus our intentions through prayer, through repentance, and through fasting,” he explained. “Jews go through a process each year when we try to keep ourselves on the straight and narrow.”Speaking on the Christian season of Lent, Thompson explained that the most American Christian traditions do not fast as fervently as their faith counterparts. “We are not as observant as our brothers and sisters of other faiths,” he said. “If we fast at all, we usually fast on Ash Wednesday and Good Friday. But during Lent, we also have this practice of taking on a spiritual discipline or giving up something that we love.“It becomes sort of a joke in many Christian churches. I give up beer every year because I really like it! I like to come home at the end of the day with a really cold, really hoppy, dark beer. And when I come home, and I am deprived of that, it reminds me that I am trying to live in some way like Jesus did during his time of temptation.”Audience members asked several thought-provoking questions regarding the role of women in each religion, the meaning of traditional dress, and the call to charity shared by each faith.At one point, an older Christian woman, who admitted her only knowledge of Islam comes from the media, expressed anger with what she perceived as the disparagement of women and the lack of education of Muslim Imams, or leaders. But before Khumawala could fully respond, she added, “I know there are Imams with a political point of view that ask their congregations to ‘rise up.’  That is a lot of power for one person to have, so where does that come from?”At that point, Thompson interjected with the only applause-line of night, stating, “The late Rev. Jerry Falwell, a highly educated Christian leader, went on CNN and said about Muslims, ‘Blow them all away in the name of the Lord.’ So I would simply offer that it is an equal opportunity misuse of one’s religious power. We see it more in our news media, but I don’t think that it is really any more prevalent amongst leaders in the Muslim world than it is among Christian leaders in the western world.”In regards to traditional clothing, Gross added, “I encourage all of you with questions to sit next to a woman wearing a hijab or traditional dress, and you might learn so much more from them. Often from our western eyes, it is seen as something of subjugation, but in my experience it is almost always a matter of choice. In Judaism, some men choose to wear a yarmulke and in some more orthodox traditions, women will cover their heads… It is a wonderful, complex cultural tradition.”The discussion ended with a question regarding each faith’s common call to charity. A young Muslim woman explained that charity is a central tenet of Islam and asked why it is also important to the Jewish and Christian faiths. Drawing upon that sense of ecumenism, Thompson explained why Christians are called to see God in all things.“John’s Gospel, the beginning of Genesis and some of Paul’s letters in the New Testament say that the Christ is incarnate in all things. And while we don’t mean to co-opt your faith into our own, what that means is it’s not just metaphorical that if I feed you, I feed Jesus. The Christ is, in fact, incarnate in you. When we will say in our better moments that there is truth in Islam that you can teach us, that there is truth in Judaism that you can teach us, that is because Christ is also incarnate in your faith. So the truth you teach us is in fact Christ teaching us.”Gross also explained another commonality in the religions as he noted, “Many people in this audience probably don’t know that Jesus is also the Messiah in Islam. So it is important for the world to know that there is huge amounts of overlap in our faiths.”“And Jesus was also a quite faithful and observant Jew,” Thompson added.Following the discussion, Khumawala issued the Islamic call to prayer, and the Islamic community prayed in the parish hall before everyone took part in the Iftaar dinner with jazz musicians playing in the background.Friends of Iman provides scholarships for disadvantaged young people all over the world, especially girls. The organization, which is spearheaded by Iman Haq’s mother, Naila Qureshi, first held this interfaith dinner two years ago with just a few participants. This year, that number swelled to well over 100 participants and continues to grow. Learn more about Friends of Iman here. Cathedral Dean Boise, ID Associate Rector for Family Ministries Anchorage, AK Rector Hopkinsville, KY Rector (FT or PT) Indian River, MI Curate Diocese of Nebraska Featured Jobs & Calls The Church Pension Fund Invests $20 Million in Impact Investment Fund Designed to Preserve Workforce Housing Communities Nationwide Church Pension Group Rector Shreveport, LA Priest-in-Charge Lebanon, OH Rector Belleville, IL Virtual Celebration of the Jerusalem Princess Basma Center Zoom Conversation June 19 @ 12 p.m. ET July 15, 2013 at 4:22 pm Congratulations on real Interfaith work. Yours might really encourage more of the same. Our country has changed and we have to acknowledge that in churches. An Evening with Presiding Bishop Curry and Iconographer Kelly Latimore Episcopal Migration Ministries via Zoom June 23 @ 6 p.m. ET Virtual Episcopal Latino Ministry Competency Course Online Course Aug. 9-13 Bishop Diocesan Springfield, IL An Evening with Aliya Cycon Playing the Oud Lancaster, PA (and streaming online) July 3 @ 7 p.m. ET Assistant/Associate Priest Scottsdale, AZ Episcopal Church releases new prayer book translations into Spanish and French, solicits feedback Episcopal Church Office of Public Affairs Priest Associate or Director of Adult Ministries Greenville, SC TryTank Experimental Lab and York St. John University of England Launch Survey to Study the Impact of Covid-19 on the Episcopal Church TryTank Experimental Lab By Luke BlountPosted Jul 15, 2013 Comments (1) Canon for Family Ministry Jackson, MS Episcopal Charities of the Diocese of New York Hires Reverend Kevin W. VanHook, II as Executive Director Episcopal Charities of the Diocese of New York Seminary of the Southwest announces appointment of two new full time faculty members Seminary of the Southwest Course Director Jerusalem, Israel Youth Minister Lorton, VA Director of Administration & Finance Atlanta, GA Curate (Associate & Priest-in-Charge) Traverse City, MI Assistant/Associate Rector Morristown, NJ Rector Knoxville, TN center_img Submit an Event Listing Inaugural Diocesan Feast Day Celebrating Juneteenth San Francisco, CA (and livestream) June 19 @ 2 p.m. PT AddThis Sharing ButtonsShare to PrintFriendlyPrintFriendlyShare to FacebookFacebookShare to TwitterTwitterShare to EmailEmailShare to MoreAddThis Associate Priest for Pastoral Care New York, NY Associate Rector Columbus, GA Submit a Job Listing In-person Retreat: Thanksgiving Trinity Retreat Center (West Cornwall, CT) Nov. 24-28 Rector Collierville, TN Episcopal Migration Ministries’ Virtual Prayer Vigil for World Refugee Day Facebook Live Prayer Vigil June 20 @ 7 p.m. ET Rector Bath, NC Rector Martinsville, VA The Church Investment Group Commends the Taskforce on the Theology of Money on its report, The Theology of Money and Investing as Doing Theology Church Investment Group Rector/Priest in Charge (PT) Lisbon, ME Rector Albany, NY Rector Smithfield, NC Rector Washington, DC Ecumenical & Interreligious Missioner for Disaster Resilience Sacramento, CA Director of Music Morristown, NJ Georgiana Cameron says: Tags Rector Pittsburgh, PA Press Release Service Comments are closed. Rector and Chaplain Eugene, OR Rector Tampa, FL Assistant/Associate Rector Washington, DC Ya no son extranjeros: Un diálogo acerca de inmigración Una conversación de Zoom June 22 @ 7 p.m. ET Submit a Press Release Join the Episcopal Diocese of Texas in Celebrating the Pauli Murray Feast Online Worship Service June 27 Featured Events New Berrigan Book With Episcopal Roots Cascade Books Family Ministry Coordinator Baton Rouge, LAlast_img read more

Archbishop writes to ecumenical partners about women bishops

first_img Press Release Service Tags Rector Smithfield, NC Assistant/Associate Rector Washington, DC Christopher Johnson says: Anglican Communion, July 18, 2014 at 11:32 pm Best of luck. The Russian Orthodox Church has already shut the door:https://mospat.ru/en/2014/07/16/news105568/ July 18, 2014 at 8:31 pm The Via Media is a hard path, embracing tradition on one hand, and innovation on the other takes courage and a willingness to listen afresh to the Holy Spirit. I rejoice in the leadership of Justin Cantaur and continue to pray for the unity of Christ’s Holy Catholic Church The Church Investment Group Commends the Taskforce on the Theology of Money on its report, The Theology of Money and Investing as Doing Theology Church Investment Group July 23, 2014 at 2:44 pm Whenever this issue is discussed, one never refers to the Gospel teaching us women where the only ones in Jesus’ circle who did not abandon him at the hour of his crucifixion. Women not worthy to lead the flock of Christian followers? Really? Associate Priest for Pastoral Care New York, NY Associate Rector Columbus, GA Rector Collierville, TN New Berrigan Book With Episcopal Roots Cascade Books July 19, 2014 at 5:16 am Thank you for this acknowledgement of differences within the Anglican communion regarding Anglican women’s ordained ministry and episcopal participation. Your example of willingness to engage in pastoral discernment with all sections of the Anglican communion is particularly significant in my Anglican Diocese of Sydney, Australia. As a mature age Anglican woman ministry student living in Sydney and placed at St James King Street, but undergoing ordination discernment for the priesthood with Bathurst Anglican Diocese because the Sydney Anglican Synod has banned women’s ordination to the priesthood, here, I am particularly grateful for this peacemaking intervention. Remember Holy Land Christians on Jerusalem Sunday, June 20 American Friends of the Episcopal Diocese of Jerusalem Featured Jobs & Calls Course Director Jerusalem, Israel Archbishop of Canterbury, Karen Pearson says: Director of Music Morristown, NJ Rector/Priest in Charge (PT) Lisbon, ME Episcopal Migration Ministries’ Virtual Prayer Vigil for World Refugee Day Facebook Live Prayer Vigil June 20 @ 7 p.m. ET Episcopal Charities of the Diocese of New York Hires Reverend Kevin W. VanHook, II as Executive Director Episcopal Charities of the Diocese of New York Submit a Press Release Submit an Event Listing Episcopal Church releases new prayer book translations into Spanish and French, solicits feedback Episcopal Church Office of Public Affairs Elizabeth Sheppard says: Associate Rector for Family Ministries Anchorage, AK Seminary of the Southwest announces appointment of two new full time faculty members Seminary of the Southwest [Lambeth Palace] Archbishop of Canterbury Justin Welby has written to ecumenical partners about the General Synod’s decision to allow women to become bishops, emphasizing that churches “need each other.”An ENS article about the Church of England’s decision to enable women to serve as bishops is available here.The text of Welby’s letter, which is being posted to partner churches, follows.This comes to you with warm Christian greetings and the wish to communicate personally to you the decision of the General Synod of the Church of England to admit women to the episcopate.This is an occasion of deep rejoicing for many, especially for many of the women clergy in the Church of England. They feel that this decision affirms their place and ministry in the life of the Church. For others in the Church of England, the decision may be a source of disappointment and concern.As the Synod moved towards the decision many were struck by the spirit of the debate: frankness, passion and, I am glad to say, a good deal of Christian charity.  It all indicated an intention and sincere assurance to hold all of us together in one Church. There appeared a determination that the genuinely held differences on the issue of the ordination of women to the episcopate should not become a dividing factor in the Church of England, and there was care and expressions of love for those troubled by the outcome.The Bishops have sought to build trust across the Church. The five principles outlined by them in their declaration form part of the package approved. Principles 3 and 4 are ecumenically relevant.I give below these principles:1.  Now that legislation has been passed to enable women to become bishops the Church of England is fully and unequivocally committed to all orders of ministry being open equally to all, without reference to gender, and holds that those whom it has duly ordained and appointed to office are the true and lawful holders of the office which they occupy and thus deserve due respect and canonical obedience;                           2.  Anyone who ministers within the Church of England must be prepared to acknowledge that the Church of England has reached a clear decision on the matter; 3.  Since it continues to share the historic episcopate with other Churches, including the Roman Catholic Church, the Orthodox Church and those provinces of the Anglican Communion which continue to ordain only men as priests or bishops, the Church of England acknowledges that its own clear decision on ministry and gender is set within a broader process of discernment within the Anglican Communion and the whole Church of God;  4. Since those within the Church of England who, on grounds of theological conviction, are unable to receive the ministry of women bishops or priests continue to be within the spectrum of teaching and tradition of the Anglican Communion, the Church of England remains committed to enabling them to flourish within its life and structures; and5.  Pastoral and sacramental provision for the minority within the Church of England will be made without specifying a limit of time and in a way that maintains the highest possible degree of communion and contributes to mutual flourishing across the whole Church of England.  The Church of England continues in its quest to make our unity more visible with those with whom we are in communion, and to seek greater unity with those with whom we are not yet in communion. Some of our Sister Churches in communion will share the joy of those in the Church of England, who welcome the development of having women in the episcopate. But we are also aware that our other ecumenical partners may find this a further difficulty on the journey towards full communion. There is, however, much that unites us, and I pray that the bonds of friendship will continue to be strengthened and that our understanding of each other’s traditions will grow.Finally, it is clear to me that whilst our theological dialogue will face new challenges, there is nonetheless so much troubling our world today that our common witness to the Gospel is of more importance than ever. There is conflict in many regions of our world, acute poverty, unemployment and an influx of oppressed people driven away from their own countries and seeking refuge elsewhere. We need each other, as we, as churches empowered by the Holy Spirit, rise to the challenge and proclaim the good news of our Lord and Saviour Jesus Christ and strive for closer fellowship and greater unity. I do recognise that there are issues that raise difficulties, but I do also take courage from the words communicated to one of my predecessors by a significant Orthodox brother which have become dear to me:In spite of such obstacles, we cannot allow ourselves to congeal the love between us which is also manifested in dialogue so “let us run with perseverance the race that is set before us” with the good hope that the Lord of powers and mercy “will not let us be tested beyond our strength, but with the testing he will also provide the way out so that we may be able to endure it” (1 Cor. 10:13). It is therefore in this spirit that I greet you and ask for your prayers for our ministry in the Church of England.The Most Reverend and Right Honourable Justin WelbyArchbishop of Canterbury Featured Events July 19, 2014 at 12:07 pm This says something quite startling about the quality and validity of sacerdotal theology of ordination which has shaped the church’s thinking for generations which is deeply disturbing.For me it is a Chamberlain compromise which won us “peace at all costs” – even our theological integrity. Bottom line: Women are either fully authorized by ordination or they are not.If, in paragraph #4 and #5, we substituted “African” or “Asian” or “disabled person” for “women” there would be an outcry that would be heard round the world. But women? Meh!And . . . and . . . AND . . .. since misogyny and homophobia walk hand in hand, this does not bode well for LGBT people in the CofE.So, while I DO, in fact, rejoice that those women who truly feel called to the episcopacy will now be able to respond to their vocation, it is tempered by my disappointment over this serious compromise with ideological tyrants which will bring a peace that will prove to be quite costly – not just to women and LGBT people, but – to the Gospel of Jesus Christ.That’s just my tuppence on the matter.Your mileage may vary. Rector Hopkinsville, KY Harry W Shipps says: Rector Albany, NY AddThis Sharing ButtonsShare to PrintFriendlyPrintFriendlyShare to FacebookFacebookShare to TwitterTwitterShare to EmailEmailShare to MoreAddThis Join the Episcopal Diocese of Texas in Celebrating the Pauli Murray Feast Online Worship Service June 27 Comments (10) Bishop Diocesan Springfield, IL Ya no son extranjeros: Un diálogo acerca de inmigración Una conversación de Zoom June 22 @ 7 p.m. ET Ecumenical & Interreligious, Rector Bath, NC Rector Belleville, IL Virtual Celebration of the Jerusalem Princess Basma Center Zoom Conversation June 19 @ 12 p.m. ET center_img Rector Shreveport, LA Priest Associate or Director of Adult Ministries Greenville, SC Rector Washington, DC Rector Tampa, FL TryTank Experimental Lab and York St. John University of England Launch Survey to Study the Impact of Covid-19 on the Episcopal Church TryTank Experimental Lab An Evening with Presiding Bishop Curry and Iconographer Kelly Latimore Episcopal Migration Ministries via Zoom June 23 @ 6 p.m. ET July 18, 2014 at 4:34 pm Praise be to the General Synod’s decision, and it is appropriate for the Archbishop to communicate pastorally to the broader church with respect and with affirmation of the General Synod’s decision.I only wish that he had done the same thing a month or so ago with respect to LGBT people being included fully in the life of the Church and its sacrament of marriage. Instead, his message then was yet another triumph of cowardice, fear and disrespect. The Rev. Dr. E. McCoy, PhD says: Michael Craig Patterson says: Rector Pittsburgh, PA Canon for Family Ministry Jackson, MS Family Ministry Coordinator Baton Rouge, LA Assistant/Associate Rector Morristown, NJ Submit a Job Listing Curate Diocese of Nebraska In-person Retreat: Thanksgiving Trinity Retreat Center (West Cornwall, CT) Nov. 24-28 Women’s Ministry Priest-in-Charge Lebanon, OH Archbishop writes to ecumenical partners about women bishops July 18, 2014 at 6:51 pm Let’s “enable them to flourish” (those who are disconcerted by inclusion of women in the full range of ordained ministry) by encouraging a new ‘conviction’ based on the spiritual discernment of our collective hearts as expressed in the General Synod’s decision. Remember, God is indeed doing a new thing in bringing to fullness the whole kingdom of God. Could it be that one’s individual, deeply held, sincere conviction is also subject to God’s saving grace? As Anglicans, we pray that this is so. Rector and Chaplain Eugene, OR Youth Minister Lorton, VA The Church Pension Fund Invests $20 Million in Impact Investment Fund Designed to Preserve Workforce Housing Communities Nationwide Church Pension Group An Evening with Aliya Cycon Playing the Oud Lancaster, PA (and streaming online) July 3 @ 7 p.m. ET Wm. Thomas Martin says: Michael Grear says: Missioner for Disaster Resilience Sacramento, CA July 18, 2014 at 4:21 pm Well spoken, Archbishop. July 18, 2014 at 7:14 pm Well constructed statement Archbishop. Director of Administration & Finance Atlanta, GA Posted Jul 18, 2014 Rector Martinsville, VA July 19, 2014 at 12:17 pm Strom Thumond (our late senator from SC who once ran for the US presidency on a segregationist ticket)) was still alive when the ECUSA finally decided to mandate that women from all dioceses have a path for entering the priesthood. Some of our bishops were still unwilling, and some wanted to make provision for them. I understand, and applaud their concern, but what if we decided to make provisions for the racists among us, so they wouldn’t have to deal with other races/cultures? Would that be ok? What’s the difference? How long must we wait? Comments are closed. Curate (Associate & Priest-in-Charge) Traverse City, MI Rector (FT or PT) Indian River, MI This Summer’s Anti-Racism Training Online Course (Diocese of New Jersey) June 18-July 16 Inaugural Diocesan Feast Day Celebrating Juneteenth San Francisco, CA (and livestream) June 19 @ 2 p.m. PT Assistant/Associate Priest Scottsdale, AZ the Rev’d Dr. Elizabeth Kaeton says: Cathedral Dean Boise, ID Rector Knoxville, TN martha knight says: last_img read more

Canada: The making of Mishamikoweesh

first_img Join the Episcopal Diocese of Texas in Celebrating the Pauli Murray Feast Online Worship Service June 27 New Berrigan Book With Episcopal Roots Cascade Books Priest Associate or Director of Adult Ministries Greenville, SC Episcopal Migration Ministries’ Virtual Prayer Vigil for World Refugee Day Facebook Live Prayer Vigil June 20 @ 7 p.m. ET Episcopal Church releases new prayer book translations into Spanish and French, solicits feedback Episcopal Church Office of Public Affairs Rector Collierville, TN This Summer’s Anti-Racism Training Online Course (Diocese of New Jersey) June 18-July 16 Submit a Job Listing Assistant/Associate Priest Scottsdale, AZ Youth Minister Lorton, VA By Leigh Anne WilliamsPosted Aug 8, 2014 Rector Belleville, IL Virtual Celebration of the Jerusalem Princess Basma Center Zoom Conversation June 19 @ 12 p.m. ET Anglican Communion, Rector Pittsburgh, PA In-person Retreat: Thanksgiving Trinity Retreat Center (West Cornwall, CT) Nov. 24-28 Inaugural Diocesan Feast Day Celebrating Juneteenth San Francisco, CA (and livestream) June 19 @ 2 p.m. PT Family Ministry Coordinator Baton Rouge, LA Canon for Family Ministry Jackson, MS Course Director Jerusalem, Israel Tags Rector Smithfield, NC Rector Martinsville, VA Missioner for Disaster Resilience Sacramento, CA Associate Rector Columbus, GA Rector Knoxville, TN Seminary of the Southwest announces appointment of two new full time faculty members Seminary of the Southwest The Church Investment Group Commends the Taskforce on the Theology of Money on its report, The Theology of Money and Investing as Doing Theology Church Investment Group The Church Pension Fund Invests $20 Million in Impact Investment Fund Designed to Preserve Workforce Housing Communities Nationwide Church Pension Group Children and youth gathered last June at Kingfisher Lake in northern Ontario to celebrate the creation of the Anglican Church of Canada’s first indigenous diocese. Photo: Anglican Video[Anglican Journal] Anglican Video is producing a documentary on the creation of the Spiritual Indigenous Ministry of Mishamikoweesh, the first indigenous diocese in the Anglican Church of Canada.Lisa Barry, Anglican Video senior producer, says the documentary—which will be available in 2015—explains the genesis and evolution of the new diocese, beginning with the dream of pioneering aboriginal priest the Rev. William Winter. “This diocese was William Winter’s dream,” says Barry. “It began to be articulated at the first Sacred Circle in 1989 and it has come to fruition in the installation of Bishop Lydia [Mamakwa].”  Mamakwa’s installation and the celebration of the new diocese took place in the first week of June at Kingfisher Lake in northern Ontario.Footage of the celebration and interviews with Mamakwa and other people in the community have already been posted on the church’s website, but the documentary is intended to provide the historical context documented by Anglican Video.“It’s been such a privilege…to film every Sacred Circle,” says Barry, explaining that the first Sacred Circle in 1989 was the first time Anglican aboriginal clergy from across the country gathered. Barry added that it has also been a privilege to witness the changes in what was voiced in those gatherings. “What you saw at the first Sacred Circle [was] a glimmer of hope and a lot of pain…And in 1994, it was just like a river or a sea of pain, with the people sharing about residential schools and the apology,” she said. “And then it became about rebuilding. And Lydia’s installation was a… glorious moment, to see the tremendous pride and hope and just grace that was visited upon that event.” Anglican Video filmed the new diocese’s first Sacred Circle, which will be its governing body, functioning like a synod, as well as the week’s celebrations, which included evening gospel music jamborees.Barry says she hopes the documentary will be useful when Mamakwa tells the story of Mishamikoweesh in communities and also for helping all Anglicans understand the purpose and meaning of this new indigenous diocese, especially the fact that it is not a movement to separate from the church but to create an indigenous diocese within the church. “That was what was stressed over and over again,” said Barry, explaining that the message was, “We are walking together…We are not leaving you. We are walking with you as equal partners.”Barry said the documentary marks both an end and a beginning. “It is the fruition of this dream, but now the work is ahead.”But Barry said the stories she has heard from people in the community indicate that Mamakwa is well equipped to lead them through new challenges. She recounted the story of one young woman who said that Mamakwa had cared for her at a time when she was despondent about the suicides of friends, inviting her to be involved and help in the church with other youth. She told Barry that many people have such stories of Mamakwa personally inviting them, watching over them, encouraging them and trying to help them to heal. “I heard so many stories like that. I think what a tremendous testament to Lydia as a leader—in her quiet way, saving her community and saving young people,” said Barry.The video, when finished, will be available online on the church’s website and from Anglican Video.– See more at: http://www.anglicanjournal.com/articles/the-making-of-mishamikoweesh#sthash.s69gB3pP.dpuf Associate Rector for Family Ministries Anchorage, AK Cathedral Dean Boise, ID Canada: The making of Mishamikoweeshcenter_img Rector (FT or PT) Indian River, MI Associate Priest for Pastoral Care New York, NY Assistant/Associate Rector Morristown, NJ Press Release Service Curate Diocese of Nebraska Curate (Associate & Priest-in-Charge) Traverse City, MI Bishop Diocesan Springfield, IL Submit a Press Release Episcopal Charities of the Diocese of New York Hires Reverend Kevin W. VanHook, II as Executive Director Episcopal Charities of the Diocese of New York Director of Music Morristown, NJ Rector Tampa, FL Director of Administration & Finance Atlanta, GA Rector Shreveport, LA Rector Hopkinsville, KY Submit an Event Listing Rector Bath, NC An Evening with Aliya Cycon Playing the Oud Lancaster, PA (and streaming online) July 3 Featured Jobs & Calls Indigenous Ministries Rector Albany, NY Rector/Priest in Charge (PT) Lisbon, ME AddThis Sharing ButtonsShare to PrintFriendlyPrintFriendlyShare to FacebookFacebookShare to TwitterTwitterShare to EmailEmailShare to MoreAddThis Rector and Chaplain Eugene, OR Rector Washington, DC An Evening with Presiding Bishop Curry and Iconographer Kelly Latimore Episcopal Migration Ministries via Zoom June 23 @ 6 p.m. ET Priest-in-Charge Lebanon, OH Ya no son extranjeros: Un diálogo acerca de inmigración Una conversación de Zoom June 22 @ 7 p.m. ET Featured Events Remember Holy Land Christians on Jerusalem Sunday, June 20 American Friends of the Episcopal Diocese of Jerusalem TryTank Experimental Lab and York St. John University of England Launch Survey to Study the Impact of Covid-19 on the Episcopal Church TryTank Experimental Lab Assistant/Associate Rector Washington, DClast_img read more