Jury to resume deliberations at trial of father accused of murdering daughter

first_imgST. JOHN’S, N.L. — A Newfoundland jury is expected to resume deliberations this morning at the trial of a man accused of the first-degree murder of his five-year-old daughter.Trent Butt is accused in the death of his daughter Quinn at his Carbonear, N.L., home in April 2016.After closing arguments and the judge’s charge Thursday, the jury deliberated for about four hours before retiring for the evening.Butt testified at the St. John’s, N.L., trial that he did not remember killing Quinn, but said he found himself over her body and concluded he must have suffocated her.Crown lawyer Lloyd Strickland said the killing was a calculated plan to inflict suffering on her mother, his estranged wife.But Butt’s lawyer, Derek Hogan, told the court there was no way to know Butt’s thought process on the night Quinn was killed.The jury is being asked to decide whether the death was planned and deliberate, which would mean Butt is guilty of first-degree murder, or if he is guilty of a lesser charge.In his charge to the jury, Justice Donald Burrage of the provincial supreme court asked jurors to put aside their emotions while considering the case’s distressing evidence.“This has proven to be an emotionally charged trial. A man stands charged with the first-degree murder of his own daughter,” Burrage said.“You must put aside any feelings of emotion you may harbour, consider the evidence with an open mind and make your decision without sympathy, prejudice or fear.”Holly McKenzie-Sutter, The Canadian Presslast_img read more

Mounties put more eyes in the sky with expanding drone fleet

first_imgOTTAWA — Newly disclosed records show the RCMP has assembled a fleet of more than 200 flying drones — eyes in the sky that officers use for everything from accident-scene investigation to protecting VIP visitors.The compact airborne devices are equipped with tools including video cameras and thermal-image detectors.An RCMP privacy assessment of the technology says the force is committed to protecting any personal information the drones collect and that officers strive to comply with federal laws.But one privacy expert notes the assessment, recently released under the Access to Information Act, was drafted in 2017 — seven years after the Mounties began using drones.Micheal Vonn of the British Columbia Civil Liberties Association says the assessment also provides few details about the technical capabilities of the cameras attached to the drones. She says there are legitimate policing uses for drones but also potentially invasive ones, such as taking photos at public events so they can be electronically run against images in databases.The Canadian Presslast_img read more

Angelina Jolie Donates 50000 To Girls Education Fund

first_imgAngelina Jolie has donated $50,000 to the Women in the World Foundation’s Woman of Impact Emergency Appeal for Girls’ Education Fund.In honor of Malala Yousafzai, the 14-year old Pakistani girl who was tragically shot by the Taliban for exercising her fundamental right to an education, the Women in the World Foundation is launching a Woman of Impact Award for Girls’ Education to provide funds to women and girls fighting for girls’ education in Pakistan and Afghanistan.The Foundation is making an emergency appeal to their Women in the World Community to join Tina Brown and Angelina Jolie in this campaign. One-hundred percent of the proceeds will go towards girls’ education on the ground in Pakistan and Afghanistan. Jolie’s Education Partnership for Children of Conflict will contribute the first $50,000 to this effort.“We are sure you have been shaken by the news that last week, 14-year old Malala Yousafzai was shot in the head by the Taliban as she left school in the Swat Valley in Pakistan,” said Angelina Jolie and Women in the World Foundation founder Tina Brown in a joint statement. “Her crime was promoting girls’ education in Pakistan and publishing a blog about life under the Taliban. She remains unconscious, and has been flown from Pakistan to the United Kingdom to receive specialist treatment.“As a response to Malala’s bravery, girls across Pakistan, Afghanistan and the world are standing up and saying, “I am Malala” – and this is our opportunity to show the same solidarity.”To join Angelina in donating to the cause, click here. To read Angelina’s reaction to the shooting of Malala, see our earlier story.last_img read more

Dallas Star Linda Gray Wants To Find A Cure For Alzheimers Disease

first_imgDid you know that 2/3 of the 5.5 million Americans currently suffering from Alzheimer’s disease are women? TV star Linda Gray (Sue Ellen Ewing from CBS-TV’s “Dallas”) experienced the disease first hand, affecting both her mother and a close friend. This has inspired Linda to join a new, national public service announcement (PSA) campaign to help find a treatment for Alzheimer’s disease by 2025.Video: Linda Gray Brain Health Registry PSAThe PSA encourages people across the country to join in the fight for a cure by registering online at www.brainhealthregistry.org.“I lost my mother and a dear friend to Alzheimer’s disease,” explained Ms. Gray, “and wanted to do something to help. The wife of my dear friend Larry Hagman is suffering from Alzheimer’s, and when he passed, she did not even know it. This heartbreaking story is being repeated in homes across America, and now there is something all Americans can do to help. The Brain Health Registry is a free, online platform that collects data about members to help speed clinical trials with the goal of finding a treatment by 2025. I’m doing my part and am asking everyone to join this noble effort.”#GrayMatters is part of a national campaign led by Global Alzheimer’s Platform Foundation in partnership with UC San Francisco’s online Brain Health Registry. The initiative’s goal is to grow a registry of potential Alzheimer’s clinical trial candidates and accelerate a treatment for Alzheimer’s disease by 2025. Encouraging enrollment for these trials has been a major barrier in researching Alzheimer’s treatment to date, across both sexes and diverse populations. The effort also includes support from major medical institutions across the country, including UCSF, researchers at Harvard Medical School, Emory University Alzheimer’s Disease Research Center, Alpert Medical School of Brown University, Cleveland Clinic’s Lou Ruvo Center for Brain Health, Banner Alzheimer’s Institute, Baylor University, and Washington University in St. Louis.Those who wish to help in the fight against Alzheimer’s disease can register free at www.brainhealthregistry.org and help spread the word using #BeatAlzheimers.last_img read more

Hour of Twilight

first_imgHaving a conversation with John Bentley Mays, who died suddenly while on a walk with friends in High Park in Toronto last Friday, could be a disorienting experience. First of all, his bald head was unusually large and bulbous, as though made to be chiseled from marble, and his eyes, gazing out from behind glasses with thick black rims, had a fixed, unblinking attentiveness that rarely betrayed where his singular mind was roaming.But despite his seemingly imperious—if not impenetrable—presence, his voice was disarmingly gentle and had a distinctive drawl. Though by the end he had spent more than half his life in Toronto, a city he loved and explored deeply, Bentley Mays never lost the quality of being a southern gentlemen, an enduring trace of a complicated childhood on a crumbling cotton plantation in America’s deep south. “When I first read Faulkner,” he once told me, “I really thought I was reading about my childhood.” LEAVE A REPLY Cancel replyLog in to leave a comment Login/Register With: Advertisement Twitter Facebook Advertisementlast_img read more

Cera still Canadian to his core as he dons his superhero cape

first_img Twitter You can take the boy out of Canada but you can’t take Canada out of the boy. When I meet with Brampton, Ont.-born Michael Cera to chat about his new project, The Lego Batman Movie, he’s having lunch, eating a Waldorf salad. The 28-year-old began his career in Canada with a Tim Hortons summer camp commercial before decamping to the United States, finding fame with Arrested Development and a string of successful movies like Superbad and Juno, but has retained his disarming Canadian politeness. I walk in, he jumps up, “Do you want anything? Cheese? A coffee? How are you doing?” Facebook Advertisement LEAVE A REPLY Cancel replyLog in to leave a comment Login/Register With: Advertisement Advertisementlast_img read more

Flow Connects with the Caribbean Diaspora at the YOWronto Music Festival in

first_imgAdvertisement Login/Register With: LEAVE A REPLY Cancel replyLog in to leave a comment TORONTO, ON–(Marketwired – May 11, 2017) –  Flow has joined forces with FreshKut Productions Inc. as a telecommunications sponsor for the inaugural staging of Canada’s YOWronto Music Festival, as the Company and organizers seek to forge stronger ties between Canada and the Caribbean.With a strong Caribbean Diaspora population in Toronto (and throughout Canada), the YOWronto Music Festival provides Flow with the perfect opportunity to connect with Caribbean people living abroad. The Company is using its mobile top-up platform http://www.topupflow.com/topup/order as the main technology connector for the festival. The platform enables Caribbean people living abroad to send mobile credit back home quickly and conveniently, to ensure they are always connected.Karl Haughton, a Director of FreshKut Productions, Inc. said, “I am really excited that Flow has agreed to come on board as a sponsor. It is a testament to the company’s commitment to support Caribbean people, culture and content and the YOWronto Music Festival provides such a great opportunity for that.” Advertisement Advertisement The YOWronto Music Festival features international and Caribbean recording artistes including Alison Hinds, Baby Cham, Romain Virgo, Lieutenant Stitchie, Eric Donaldson, Professor Nuts and Tessanne Chin. An exciting line up of Canadian artistes including Michie Mee, Jay Harmony, Carlos Morgan, Blessed, Kim Davis, Ammoye Evans, and Jimmy Reid will also perform.“We’re excited by this opportunity to support this unique festival that celebrates Caribbean culture in Canada,” said James McElvanna, VP Products at Cable & Wireless, operator of Flow. “The festival gives us an opportunity to showcase our convenient top-up platform developed especially for the diaspora to help keep them connected with friends and family in the region.” McElvanna says the online top-up platform is easy to use; people living Toronto, for example, simply need to go to the website, add the local Flow phone number of a friend or relative and send credit to them to stay connected.The YOWronto Music Festival is a musical extravaganza geared towards Caribbean people living in Toronto, and this year’s event is intended to coincide with the celebration of Canada’s 150th year of Confederation. This Festival will be held at Woodbine Mall on Saturday July 1, and Sunday, July 2, 2017, and will boast a variety of activities for all ages. The Festival will commence at 11:00 am and end at 11:00 pm on both days.About C&W CommunicationsC&W is a full service communications and entertainment provider and delivers market-leading video, broadband, telephony and mobile services to consumers in 18 countries. Through its business division, C&W provides data center hosting, domestic and international managed network services, and customized IT service solutions, utilizing cloud technology to serve business and government customers.C&W also operates a state-of-the-art submarine fiber network — the most extensive in the region.Learn more at www.cwc.com, or follow C&W on LinkedIn, Facebook or Twitter.About Liberty GlobalLiberty Global is the world’s largest international TV and broadband company, with operations in more than 30 countries across Europe, Latin America and the Caribbean. We invest in the infrastructure that empowers our customers to make the most of the digital revolution. Our scale and commitment to innovation enable us to develop market-leading products delivered through next-generation networks that connect our 25 million customers who subscribe to over 50 million television, broadband internet and telephony services. We also serve over 10 million mobile subscribers and offer WiFi service across 6 million access points.The Liberty Global Group operates in 11 European countries under the consumer brands Virgin Media, Unitymedia, Telenet and UPC. The Liberty Global Group also owns 50% of VodafoneZiggo, a Dutch joint venture, which has 4 million customers, 10 million fixed-line subscribers and 5 million mobile subscribers. The LiLAC Group operates in over 20 countries in Latin America and the Caribbean under the consumer brands VTR, Flow, Liberty, Más Móvil and BTC. In addition, the LiLAC Group operates a sub-sea fiber network throughout the region in over 30 markets.For more information, please visit www.libertyglobal.com Facebook Twitterlast_img read more

Q A WITH ACTRESS CLARICE GOETZ

first_imgAdvertisement Login/Register With: Advertisement AS A CHILD, DID YOU WANT TO BE AN ACTOR OR DID IT FALL INTO PLACE THROUGH OTHER ACTIVITIES?I think that I demonstrated a flair for dramatics at a pretty young age haha. I loved telling stories. I trained as a competitive figure skater for 10 years and that was my main extra-curricular as a kid. But I was always singing around the house – to the extreme annoyance of my family. I remember being obsessed with the 2007 movie musical “Hairspray” and dressing up as Penny Pingleton for Halloween that year. Although, it wasn’t until high school that I got involved in the performing arts through Shakespeare plays, musicals and show choir in my hometown of Waterloo, Ontario.WHO INSPIRED YOU TO FOLLOW YOUR DREAM TO PURSUE ACTING?There’s a commencement speech that Jim Carrey gave in 2014 about chasing your dreams. In the midst of my own mid-youth crisis, his words really woke me up. I realized that the choices I had been making about my future, were made as he put it, “out of fear, disguised as practicality”. He said that “you can fail at what you don’t want, so you might as well take a chance on doing what you love.” It hit me like a lightning bolt and I realized all at once that I wasn’t going to be truly happy pursuing a career that was not creative.WHAT CHALLENGES HAVE YOU FACED IN THE ENTERTAINMENT INDUSTRY? WHAT HAS BEEN YOUR MOST REWARDING EXPERIENCE?Auditioning was a huge challenge for me after acting school when I was first starting out. It became clear to me early on that I needed to hone my audition technique and learn how to combat my nerves. So I worked hard at it and took a couple on camera auditioning classes. Auditioning gets easier and easier every time, especially if you’re returning to a casting director who has already seen you before for another project. I’ve learned to enjoy the process (because you really have nothing to lose), and to approach every audition as an opportunity to grow as an actor, regardless of the outcome.I’m fortunate to have had many rewarding experiences performing, but some of my favourite memories have been on set. There is something electric about building a world around you that convinces even the crew members of your character’s reality while you’re filming. It’s so rewarding to collaborate with other artists and work together towards a common goal of bringing a script to life.WHAT IS YOUR FAVOURITE TYPE OF CHARACTER TO PLAY?I love playing characters that are relatable and a little dorky. No matter what the genre, I’m always looking for ways to bring comedic, human quirks to a character. And on the more dramatic side of things, I love playing characters that have fight in them, even in the most tragic circumstances. Those stories are so important to tell, and it is so fulfilling as an actor to get to delve into those characters. Most of the roles I go out for are in the teen/young adult age range, and I LOVE playing there. Teenagers are often extremely emotionally charged and have a lot going on, so it’s really fun to access that as an actor in my 20’s. I embrace all challenges.WHAT MARKET DO YOU CURRENTLY WORK IN? ARE THERE OTHER AREAS YOU WOULD LIKE TO WORK?Right now I’m focusing my energy into film and television acting, and I’m based in Toronto. The film industry is growing rapidly here, especially with festivals like TIFF giving Canadian content the exposure it deserves. I’m also very interested in the prospect of creating my own content. I’m currently in the process of writing a screenplay for a feature film that I’m hoping to star in and direct.WHAT ADVICE WOULD YOU GIVE TO SOMEONE NEW TRYING TO MAKE IT IN THE ACTING INDUSTRY?Let go of perfection. I’m a huge perfectionist in real life, and one of the biggest things I struggled with in acting school was always trying to execute the “perfect” performance that I pictured in my head. It’s okay to have high expectations of yourself as an artist but it will hinder your performance if you are so self-aware and critical of yourself that you miss out on what’s happening in the moment. Never forfeit the opportunity to work off of your scene partner. Life is messy and so are people, so your characters are allowed to be too. Don’t be afraid to give yourself the freedom to fail and know that you are never a finished product. Your craft is always a work in progress and the training never stops.WHAT FUELS YOUR PASSION?What drives me is the power to impact people. I think it’s probably the most powerful thing in the world; our ability to make someone else (especially a stranger) feel something. What I love about film is that it sort of puts a microscope on the world, and forces us to reflect on ourselves and on society as a whole. Film is more than just entertainment for the masses, it’s a catalyst for positive change. If I can spend my life being a part of that in any capacity, I will be happy.WHAT IS SOMETHING ABOUT YOU THAT MOST PEOPLE WOULD NEVER GUESS?I could probably eat more than my own body weight in popcorn.WHO ARE YOU CURRENTLY REPRESENTED BY?I’m represented by Tovah Small of Meridian Artists. She’s an absolute gem to work with.WHERE HAVE YOU TRAINED?I trained intensively in screen acting for two years in the Acting for Film & Television program at Humber College. Since graduating last year, I have trained at The Lighthouse Acting Studio and do private audition coaching sessions when time allows. I’m looking to train at Second City next!IF YOU WERE TO DO IT ALL OVER AGAIN, WOULD YOU DO THINGS EXACTLY THE SAME? DO YOU HAVE ANY REGRETS? SUCCESSES THAT MAKE YOU PROUD? I regret not starting earlier. I regret not taking singing lessons/dance lessons/acting lessons when I was a kid. But on the other hand, I had to work harder than some of my peers to sort of “catch up” and it showed me how badly I want this for myself. Work ethic is not always something that can be taught and it is one of my most valuable traits. Talent is wasted on laziness. What makes me most proud of myself is my consistent personal and artistic growth. That’s how I measure my success as an actor. This past pilot season I’ve had the opportunity to audition for so many amazing projects, many of them Netflix series, that I never would have dreamt of a year ago when I was graduating from college. Getting in the room is an accomplishment all on its own, regardless of whether or not you get the part.AGENT: Tovah Small of Meridian Artists FOLLOW CLARICE ON SOCIAL MEDIA:FACEBOOK: https://www.facebook.com/clarice.goetzINSTAGRAM: https://www.instagram.com/clarice.goetz/WEBSITE: https://www.claricegoetz.com/CLICK HERE TO VIEW ALL INTERVIEWS IN OUR ASPIRING TALENT SERIESIf you are an aspiring talent and would like to be featured in our Aspiring Talent SeriesContact Darlene via email at morrisonmediasocial@gmail.comOpen to all (e.g. Actors, Models, Singers, Dancers, Producers, Directors, etc.) Twitter Advertisementcenter_img As part of the eBoss Canada aspiring talent series, we had the opportunity to speak with Clarice Goetz.Clarice is an actress based out of Toronto working towards her dream. We had the opportunity to discuss her career with her recently. Clarice Goetz – Photo by Hilary Gauld Commercial Photography Facebook LEAVE A REPLY Cancel replyLog in to leave a comment last_img read more

MADONNA BUYS WORK FROM MONTREAL VANDAL ARTIST SHOWS IT OFF ON INSTAGRAM

first_img Facebook Advertisement MONTREAL — The Montreal street artist MissMe has sold one of her works, a self-portrait from her series “Portrait of a Vandal,” to Madonna.The singer briefly posted on her Instagram story this week a photo of the six-foot high canvas, which depicts the artist in her trademark Mickey Mouse-eared balaclava, lifting her shirt to expose her naked body.MissMe, who wears a mask to maintain anonymity, is described on her website as “an activist, feminist, and one of the most recognized outlaw artists in North America.” Advertisement Her work, which has appeared on buildings around the world, explores “her own struggles with race, gender, society, and class while uplifting icons of the past,” the site says.Madonna first noticed MissMe’s art on the streets of Lisbon in 2017. When she shared a photo of the Lisbon piece on social media, it began a relationship with the artist.MissMe, who is originally from Switzerland but has lived in Montreal for 18 years, heard that she and Madonna were going to be in Morocco at the same time for photo shoots last summer and that the singer wanted to meet her.“She came to me — I was wearing my mask obviously — and she was like, ‘I’m a great fan, but you know this already,’ ” the artist said in an interview. “I was like, ‘Wow!”‘Madonna asked about making a purchase. “As soon as I had one, I sent it to her,” she said. “She was, like, ‘All right, I love it. I want it.”‘She described her persona on the canvas sold to Madonna as “an angry woman, in a way, you could say, that is pretty head-on and violent. My series is raw, emotionally and visually.”MissMe travels frequently, finding inspiration in new urban settings. The self-described “artful vandal” rarely stays more than a few months in a row in the same city, but considers Montreal her home. LEAVE A REPLY Cancel replyLog in to leave a comment center_img Login/Register With: A piece from the series “Portrait of a Vandal by Montreal artist MissMe is shown in this recent handout photo.Hand Out / The Canadian Press Advertisement Twitterlast_img read more

GAP pulls Manifest Destiny shirt over controversy

first_imgAPTN National NewsClothing giant The Gap has found itself in hot water after the release of a T-Shirt with a term normally used in relation to the genocide of Native Americans in the 19th Century.The company is now facing an online storm and calls for boycotts until the shirt design is removed from shelves.Artist Steven Judd made his own version of the “Manifest Destiny” T-shirt and he spoke to APTN National News from Oklahoma.last_img

Supervisor agrees management of Phoenix Sinclair not good enough

first_imgAPTN National NewsThe way child services in Manitoba dealt with Phoenix Sinclair was substandard a former supervisor testified Wednesday at the inquiry looking into the five-year-old’s murder.Angela Balan was agreeing with a report completed after Sinclair’s death in 2005 that said how the case was maintained from November 2000 to March 2002 was substandard.Balan was the supervisor of Delores Chief-Abigosis who was in charge of the file from November 2000 to July the next year.Chief-Abigosis already testified she couldn’t remember much of the time she spent on the file. She also didn’t keep notes.The inquiry is looking into how child services handled Sinclair’s case.last_img read more

In Focus looks back on the Brian Sinclair story

first_imgAPTN National NewsThe life of Brian Sinclair ended tragically inside a Winnipeg emergency room in 2008.APTN has been following the story ever since.Brian was a double amputee who rolled into the health science centre in his wheel chair.  He needed his catheter changed and medication for a bladder infection.34 hours after he arrived, he was found dead in the emergency room.His family say he was ignored to death.last_img

Funding issues put Quebec First Nations police service in jeopardy … again

first_imgAPTN National NewsWhen the Quebec community of Opitciwan didn’t get the funding needed to keep their police service the province brought in Quebec’s provincial police.Language barriers were immediately felt.After months of waiting, the community received some funding to restore their police service.But that money runs out in March and even then it’s not enough.APTN’s Danielle Rochette has more on the story.last_img

Members of Siksika Nation blocking construction of homes over location

first_imgAPTN National NewsSome members of the Siksika First Nation in Alberta have stopped construction of homes with a blockade.They say the area is flood prone and want it changed.APTN’s Chris Stewart has the story.last_img

Members of Grassy Narrows in Toronto as Ontario premier expected to make

first_imgAPTN National NewsTORONTO –Members of the Grassy Narrows First Nation (Asubpeeschoseewagong) will make their yearly trip to Toronto Monday to try and convince the province of Ontario to clean up a former pulp mill that is the cause of widespread mercury poisoning in the area.Grassy Narrows First Nation sits on the English river in northwestern Ontario and for years the community has been trying to get a commitment from the Ontario government to clean up the land around a former pulp mill that spilled mercury into the local environment.Scientists studying people in the community say it is causing a number of health problems associated with mercury poisoning.Wynne said last year that more study is needed before the mercury contamination can be cleaned up.A number of members of the community will hold a river walk and news conference in Toronto.This will come on the heels of  the province’s response to the recommendations in the Truth and Reconciliation report.It’s expected that Premier Kathleen Wynne will stand in the legislature at 9am ET and apologize for Ontario’s role in the residential school era that saw Indigenous children taken from their families and sent to government run schools.The province joins Alberta and Manitoba who apologized for not doing more to protect children. Canada announced an official apology in 2008.It’s also expected that Wynne will announce a major shift in the province’s education curriculum.Last week Ontario announced an unprecedented injection of $222 million over three years for Indigenous health.Residential school survivor Andrew Wesley will be joined by Indigenous leaders from the Assembly of First Nation, Inuit Tapiriit Kanatami, Metis Federal of Ontario along the Native Women’s Association of Canada and the Ontario Friendship Centres for an announcement from the province’s premier Monday.Patrick Brown, leader of the province’s Conservative party and Andrea Horwath, leader of the provincial NDP will also take part.news@aptn.calast_img read more

Assembly of Manitoba chiefs call on RCMP to investigate online Facebook comments

first_imgAPTN National NewsA resolution at a meeting of the Assembly of Manitoba Chiefs (AMC) is calling on the RCMP to look into a number of charged comments on Facebook associated with a toddler who was killed in Edmonton.The Facebook user, Allison Wiese, posted three comments on the page of Global News including this one; “I’m so glad this baby didn’t get a chance to breed we have enough natives in Regina.”Reaction on the social network site was immediate and the issue found its way into a resolution at the AMC.“We’re not going to sweep this under the rug anymore,” said AMC Grand Chief Derek Nepinak. “We as Indigenous people have a responsibility to stand up against racism and we’re calling on a broader Canadian society to stand up against racism because it’s been a significant detriment to a peaceful society.”On social media, people are calling it a fake account – something that Nepinak said doesn’t matter.“If it is a fake account that’s fine,” said Nepinak. “A fake account is still being actioned by somebody and behind that fake account exits a human being who is strongly demonstrating hatred against our people … and that person needs to be helped on some level but they also need to be held accountable.”Anthony Raine is the 19-month-old who was murdered in Edmonton.His body was discovered Friday on the grounds of the Good Shepherds Anglican church.His father, Joseph Crier, 26, and his girlfriend, Tasha Mack, 25, have been charged with second-degree murder.According to police, the toddler died from blunt force trauma to the head.news@aptn.calast_img read more

Indigenous men switched at birth left with more questions after investigations

first_imgThe Canadian PressNORWAY HOUSE, Man. – The families of four Indigenous men who were switched at birth and sent home from a northern Manitoba hospital with the wrong parents said they were left with more questions than answers Thursday after reviews by the RCMP and Health Canada.Manitoba RCMP said no charges will be laid in the two mixups at the Norway House Indian Hospital in 1975 because there is no evidence that what happened was a criminal offence.Health Canada said its review found that the switches appear to have been accidental. The hospital did not seem to ensure identification bands were placed on newborn babies’ ankles at the time.“The families are of the view that, due to the passage of time, they will never have a complete understanding of the events that led to the misidentification,” Bill Gange, lawyer for the families, wrote in a statement.“The information gathered by the investigators has left the families filled with questions of what would their lives have been like if the Norway House hospital had followed standard procedures common in birthing centres in 1975.”The switches only came to light in the last two years.Luke Monias and Norman Barkman of Garden Hill First Nation, a fly-in community 400 kilometres northeast of Winnipeg, revealed in November 2015 that DNA tests proved they were switched at birth.Two other men from Norway House Cree Nation, Leon Swanson and David Tait Jr., came forward with the same story in August 2016. Results from DNA tests confirmed their switch.The two cases, which occurred months apart, raised the question of whether other babies could have ended up with the wrong families. Health Canada reports 239 babies were born at the hospital that year, but no other cases have come to light.When the second case became public a year ago, former health minister Jane Philpott called the situation tragic and appalling, and promised to get to the bottom of what happened.The federal report said there was conflicting information about the exact process at the hospital in 1975, but it appears identification procedures were not followed in the two cases.“The reviewers heard from multiple interviewees that the identity band was not routinely placed on the infant immediately after birth in the room where the infant had been born,” the report states.“The identification band process was not used consistently and the identification bands were not put on the baby in the room where the baby was delivered.”The report also noted that immediately after the birth of a healthy baby, the infant would be taken to the nursery to be weighed and measured.At an emotional news conference a year ago, Tait Jr. said he was desperately searching for answers.“Forty years gone,” he said, barely able to speak through his tears. “It’s pretty tough. It hit me like a ton of bricks. If anything, (I’m) angry, confused, upset. I’d like to get some answers on what’s going on.”DNA evidence confirmed that Tait Jr., 41, is the son of Charlotte Mason – the woman who raised Swanson as her son – and not Frances Tait. They also confirmed that Swanson, Tait Jr.’s life-long friend, is the biological son of Frances Tait.Monias and Barkman were born on the same day and, growing up, the two were often told they looked more like the other boy’s family.Manitoba’s former Aboriginal affairs minister Eric Robinson, who acted as a liaison for the families, suggested Thursday that the mix-up was tied to racism and neglect at the country’s few Indian hospitals in the 1970s.“Regrettably, it shows that Indian people received second-rate treatment when it came to health in those days and perhaps, some would argue, to this day.”last_img read more

New beginning for Churchill as new rail system hits the tracks

first_imgBrittany HobsonAPTN NewsIt’s been nearly a year and half since severe flooding washed out part of the railway to the town of Churchill in northern Manitoba.Since then, residents have been cut off from the southern part of the province on land.For the first time this week, the community saw a train roll through it.And now it’s a new beginning for the town.bhobson@aptn.ca@bhobs22last_img