Former officials call for WICB forensic audit

first_imgBy Collin Benjamin(ESPNCricinfio) – Former presidents and officials of the West Indies Cricket Board have urged CARICOM to conduct a forensic audit of the board in order to save West Indies cricket from “absolute and total downfall”.Six former officials – Ken Gordon, Pat Rousseau, Anthony Deyal, Charles Wilkin, Bruce Aanensen and Imran Khan – have claimed that the current WICB administration under Dave Cameron has seemingly become “untouchable”, and not doing anything would lead to the “inevitable demise” of cricket in the Caribbean.“We must reinforce the message that West Indies cricket belongs to the people of the West Indies, not to the WICB,” Gordon, WICB president from 2006 to 2008, said. “It may be timely to call for a forensic audit of the organisation. We need to lift the clouded veil which now surrounds that body. Answers are required and this can be a first step to return to the transparency required of a body which is a major beneficiary of regional resources and private sponsorship.“Many lovers of the game have said to me, ‘What can we do that would make a difference?’ The WICB seems to be untouchable. I say to them and to all cricket-lovers who are concerned, let the call for a forensic audit be loud and clear. We need to save our cricket and this has to begin with getting the WICB right. It would be entirely legitimate for CARICOM to fund such an exercise and I urge that they consider doing so.”Asked for a reaction, the WICB told ESPNcricinfo that it has hired global consultants PricewaterhouseCoopers (PWC) and KPMG to conduct the audit operations. “We maintain an internal and external audit system with PWC and KPMG respectively. You may refer to them for any additional inquiries you may have,” a WICB spokesperson said.Gordon first made the call for an audit in July and has renewed his plea in light of the WICB’s refusal to accept the latest CARICOM reform proposal and the controversial removal of Darren Sammy as captain of the West Indies T20I team.Rousseau, who served as president of the board from 1996 to 2001, said all sporting bodies need to be carefully monitored. “There should be an assurance that there is certification by an independent group that proper governance procedures are followed at all times. I would commend to all the governments in CARICOM that they create special legislation that brings all the sporting associations under an obligation to observe good governance principles and to protect the finances of the association.”Deyal, WICB’s corporate secretary between 2006 and 2008, supported Gordon’s call and also urged for an audit of country boards.“I strongly support the call. Mr Gordon has made a strong case for following the money and has proposed as the mechanism a forensic audit of the individual boards which own the WICB and of the WICB itself. There is a deep threat of the absolute and total downfall of West Indies cricket. It’s a process which is fully underway and at this stage seemingly inevitable.”Wilkin, a former chairman of the board’s governance committee, suggested that unless the board heeds the calls for change, CARICOM governments should “refuse permission for use of the stadia and refuse them access to regional cricket grounds”.“The real leverage which CARICOM has, if it seriously wants to force the WICB to change, is the control of most of the stadia used for international matches,” Wilkins said. “The WICB will not be able to host touring teams if the CARICOM governments refuse permission for use of the stadia and the various other permits required under local law.”Wilkins said he was sceptical about CARICOM’s unity considering the emergence of factions within the regional body. In June, Antigua Prime Minister Gaston Browne had stated that he would categorically reject the CARICOM’s call for dissolving the WICB.Imran Khan, a former WICB communications officer, also felt the CARICOM’s refusal to give the WICB access to certain grounds could have an impact. “Two things need to happen: mass fan boycott, and CARICOM governments refusing the WICB access to grounds which they own or control or have influence over,” Khan said.“CARICOM can no longer delay taking decisive action to rescue the regional game from the cauldron of incompetence from which it boils. To not act is to contribute to the further deterioration of the regional game and to be complicit in its inevitable demise.”last_img read more

How a few kickboxing lessons redefined Kendall Coleman’s pass rush

first_img Facebook Twitter Google+ Kendall Coleman’s parents spend their Sundays rewatching the Syracuse game from the day before. Coleman’s mother, Nikki, noticed her son is quicker off the line this year. With his body lower to the ground, he bends smoother toward the quarterback. He’s surgical with his strikes.After 1.5 sacks in his first 20 games at Syracuse, Coleman focused on his pass rush this offseason. He increased his flexibility by rehabbing an injured shoulder, studied offensive tackles and focused on the minute details of rushing the quarterback. But he didn’t know how those things connected. Everything came together 643 miles from the SU campus during a family bonding session, where Nikki introduced her 6-foot-3, 266-pound pass rusher to kickboxing.“Kendall is a guy that studies a lot,” Nikki said. “And I think going to that class with him, showing him some movements and how to move his body and his hands, I think that sticks with him.”Six games in, Coleman sits tied for seventh in the nation with six sacks for Syracuse (4-2, 1-2 Atlantic Coast). The junior defensive end said after two years of primarily stopping the run, he spent the last offseason fine-tuning his pass rush. The uptick in production is tough for Coleman to explain because one thing didn’t change. Everything did. He never focused on pass rushing before. And in an offseason full of weight lifting, deeper opponent analysis and the shifting away from the run-first mindset, a workout with mom remains the quirkiest nuance.“This is the first year that I’ve really started to grasp and figure out my body type,” Coleman said, “and how I move versus these guys and what they’re doing.”AdvertisementThis is placeholder textLaura Angle | Digital Design EditorIn Syracuse’s loss at Florida State last season — a team Coleman tallied two sacks against in 2018 — Coleman registered one quarterback hurry. Early in the fourth quarter, Coleman’s pass rush failed. When an offensive lineman punched out at Coleman, he tried to rip around him, but he wasn’t low enough. When he was stonewalled running downfield, he scrambled back inside but spun out of the play.Coleman admitted he hasn’t always studied tackle movements. He said in past years he didn’t bring his lower half with him. Tackles didn’t have to adjust to his movements. Coleman failed to turn the corner on a tackle headed for the quarterback, he said.When Coleman came home for a brief period in July, his sister, Kourtney, and Nikki wanted family-oriented activities. Nikki suggested the trio attend classes at iLoveKickboxing in Carmel, Indiana. Coleman initially declined. “He’s practical,” Nikki explained. He didn’t want Nikki paying $30 for a membership he’d use once. But Nikki and Kourtney convinced Coleman to attend an orientation class where the former three-star recruit stood out immediately.“And I was like, ‘Oh God, this guy could eat me for breakfast,’” said iLoveKickboxing Assistant Manager Tarrin Cooper.Cooper worked Coleman through his opening day routine, which is significantly lighter than a normal day of training.At 5:45 a.m. two days later, Coleman and about five other clients in the class began with what iLoveKickboxing calls SHIIT (Super high intensity interval training) for 15 minutes. After the circuit of burpees, pushups, mountain climbers, situps and various other core exercises, the group stretched for seven or eight minutes.Then came the principles that directly correlate for Coleman. The class practiced punch and kick combos on a heavy punching bag for three minutes at a time. Initially, Coleman smacked the bags too hard to combo, Cooper said. Cooper instructed him to unleash less power with each punch to throw more rapidly. With each combo, Coleman’s lower body corresponded with the movements of his upper half. If he threw a left hook punch, he stepped with his left foot.In pass rushing, the concept is called “bringing your hips through,” Coleman said. In the third quarter of Syracuse’s 30-7 win over Florida State, Coleman’s quick fake to the inside led to a rip move outside. As his left arm cut through, his left leg swung simultaneously past the Seminoles’ left tackle. He stepped with his left foot, which squared Coleman’s hips to FSU quarterback Deondre Francois and ended with a sack.“I tried to have him string together his combos,” Cooper said. “From this combo into the next combo. It helps with form overall.”Paul Schlesinger | Staff PhotographerAfter the heavy bags, Coleman worked on his hands. In one drill, a partner holds their hands shoulder-width apart, with their gloves serving as targets for the other boxer. While Coleman punched, the class emphasized locking in on a target. After each punch, boxers are taught to reset their hands and feet. The back and forth movements reminiscent of ballet dancing are also common in pass rushing.On the first drive of the second half against Clemson, Coleman stepped four times before making contact with offensive tackle Mitch Hyatt. Left. Right. Left. Right. Coleman’s lanky frame appeared nearly elastic. At the fourth step, with his feet evened up, he punched Hyatt’s shoulders with both arms and ripped through his outside shoulder en route to his first sack of the afternoon.“A defensive end is going to use his hands to get off the block or get off the line fast,” iLoveBoxing instructor Kyle Miller said. “Teaching him how to not just punch hard but bring his hands back, just as fast for those quick trigger muscles … that helped him a lot as well.”After less than a week of boxing training, Coleman returned to Syracuse. He said the kickboxing made him think more about how his body moves. He’s since kickboxed in the SU weight room several times, despite not finding teammates willing to join in.“For other guys, the stuff that they needed to work on was more oriented toward the bags on the field,” Coleman said. “And the stuff that that I needed to work on had me on the heavy bag.” Published on October 10, 2018 at 10:45 pm Contact Josh: jlschafe@syr.edu | @Schafer_44center_img Commentslast_img read more

Burnley boss Sean Dyche: Players must handle transfer pressure

first_imgBurnley boss Sean Dyche says his stars need to handle the transfer speculation around Turf Moor.Dyche believes transfer speculation is something the modern footballer has to live with, which helps them deal with it and can sometimes act as a source of inspiration for the player.“The modern footballer has a lot of that, so they can deal with it much better. Now it’s rife, it comes from a million sources, so they get used to it,” the Turf boss said.“Sometimes you can use it as a bit of fuel, you feel a bit low and it can give them a lift. Different things give you a kick and a bit of a lift.“People are affected differently, players have that much going on now.”last_img read more

​Southampton and West Ham agree to fixture swap

first_imgSouthampton and West Ham United have both agreed upon a fixture swap due to the IAAF World Athletic Championships being held at the London Stadium in August.The two clubs had originally been scheduled to face off at the stadium on Saturday August 19, but will now play the match at St. Mary’s on the same date.The reverse fixture will be held at the London Stadium on Saturday March 31.This swap means that West Ham will now play their first two matches away, and conversely, Southampton will play their opening two fixtures at home.last_img read more