Delores Mae Barrett, 88, Batesville

first_imgDelores Mae Barrett, 88, of Batesville, passed away Saturday morning, August 22, 2020 at Ripley Crossing in Milan, Indiana. She had been a resident there since August 7 and had been in failing health for several months.She was born February 5, 1932 in Franklin County, one of five children of Lloyd and Bessie (Raridan) Hammond.On January 25, 1947, she was married to Henry Clay Barrett. Mr. Barrett passed away on February 3, 1992.For over 30 years, she had worked as a seamstress at Batesville Casket Company.She was a member of the Berean Baptist church in Batesville.Survivors include a son, Ronald Wayne Barrett of Peebles, Ohio; two daughters, Connie Sue (Terry) Zimmer of Dover, Indiana and Judith Kay (Bill) Russell of Batesville, Indiana; a sister, Janet Hammond of Laurel, Indiana; six grandchildren, Michele Hendy, Wendy Voss, Sarah Obermeyer, Ben Roell, Deanna Biddle, and Jesse Zimmer; twelve great-grandchildren, Corey Biddle, Cecilia Hendy, Clara Hendy, Caitlin Zimmer-Biddle, Joseph Voss, Jr., Andrew Hendy, Johnny Voss, Trey Voss, Ava Obermeyer, Zeke Obermeyer, Dillon Zimmer, Hannah Zimmer,  Arie Obermeyer, and Agnes Anne Roell; one great-great grandchild, Noah Jossart; and her precious kitty, Fancy.She is preceded in death by her parents, her beloved husband, Henry C. Barrett, a brother, Paul Hammond, and sisters Mary Hammond and Rhilda Gabbard.Funeral services will be conducted at the convenience of the family at Phillips & Meyers Funeral Home, 1025 Franklin Avenue, Brookville, Indiana. Toby Huff and Reverend Ron Russell will officiate. Burial will follow at Laurel North Cemetery.Online condolences may be made anytime at phillipsandmeyers.com or millermosterrobbins.com.Memorial contributions may be made to Margaret Mary Health Hospice.last_img read more

Two recent past champions make group a competitive

first_imgTHE presence of the champions at the previous two editions of the ICC U19 Cricket World Cup – the Windies (2016) and South Africa (2014) apart from host New Zealand and Kenya make Group A one of the groups to watch in the preliminary stage.The Windies, led by Shimron Hetmyer had won the tournament in Bangladesh in style after losing their first game against England, the team adapting in time to the subcontinent conditions. The focus this time will be on Emmanuel Stewart and Kirstan Kallicharan, the captain and vice-captain of the side, who will have to adapt to much different conditions and take on the home side first off.The Windies have won against South Africa and Zimbabwe in two hard-fought bilateral series in preparation for the 13 January-3 February tournament and the squad also underwent an 11-day training camp in St Kitts and Nevis before travelling to New Zealand.South Africa, who had Kagiso Rabada in the squad in 2014, were nowhere near a repeat performance last time as they lost to Bangladesh and Namibia and failed to qualify for the knockouts. They then went on to lose the Plate semi-final to Zimbabwe.Only Wandile Makwetu remains in the squad from two years ago. South Africa, captained by Raynard van Tonder, lost to the Windies 2-3 in a bilateral series, but beat England in the final of a tri-nation series at home, which also involved Namibia.Matthew Breetzke was the best batsman in the triangular series with a tally of 243 runs in four matches, while Hermann Rolfes topped the bowling charts with 10 wickets in six matches. The focus will also be on Thando Ntini, son of retired pace bowler Makhaya Ntini.New Zealand will rely on home conditions after not qualifying for the knockouts in Bangladesh. They had lost to India and Nepal to finish third in the group.Led by Kaylum Boshier, also a known rugby player, the team includes Rachin Ravindra, Finn Allen, Dale Phillips and Felix Murry – all of who were a part of the team in the last World Cup. The last time the World Cup was played in New Zealand in 2010, the team had lost to Australia, the eventual champions, in the quarter-finals.Kenya will make their first World Cup appearance since 2002. They qualified for the tournament after winning the ICC Africa Under-19 World Cup Qualifiers, which also consisted of Ghana, Botswana and Uganda. Kenya won five out of their six games to qualify.Kenya then gained valuable practice with four 50-over matches against Zimbabwe in August. The team, coached by Jimmy Kamande, who played 86 One-Day Internationals and 12 Twenty20 Internationals for the senior team between 1999 and 2011, were also scheduled to play two friendly matches against Sydney Thunder in Australia before flying to New Zealand.The 15-member squad underwent a nine-day training camp in Nairobi. Aman Gandhi, 17, who was Kenya’s best batsman in the Qualifiers with 261 runs in six matches, Thomas Ochieng and Ankit Hirani form the core of the batting unit, while spin-twins Gerald Muthui and Abhishekh Chidambaram head the bowling department. (ICC MEDIA RELEASE)last_img read more

Syracuse controls 1st period, but loses to RIT, 7-4

first_imgJessica DiGirolamo snatched the puck out of the air and dropped it to her feet. Intercepting the attempted clearance, she skated back to the center of the offensive zone and tried to feed a pass to her open teammate in front. An assist would have been her second point of the night and put Orange up two goals, but her pass didn’t connect. DiGirolamo and Syracuse (1-10-0, 0-1 College Hockey America) dominated their opposition in the early minutes of Friday night’s conference battle against RIT (3-5-1,1-2), but the 7-4 score hardly reflected it. Controlling play and outshooting their opponent 14-3 in the first period alone, the Orange should’ve gone into the locker room with a sizable lead on their way to a second win of the year. The score after one, however, was just 1-0, a lead the Orange would quickly lose in the second period. Despite letting up four goals in the final frame on their way to a 7-4 loss, it was the opening period – the only one they won – they may most regret.“Those are the moments that we need to capitalize on,” forward Lauren Bellefontaine said. “In order to get that lead when we can.”Just 1:35 into the contest, freshman Madison Beishuizen blocked a shot in the defensive zone and gathered the puck. Rushing past the two RIT defenders, she found herself on a breakaway. With a chance to take an early lead, she fanned on the shot attempt and the puck rolled wide. Under 10 minutes later, DiGirolamo scored the game’s first goal compliments of a pair of RIT deflections. The puck ricocheted off the Tiger forward stepping in front of her shot, and then again off a skate to the right of the crease. With RIT kicking the puck into its own net, it looked like the early bounces were going to go the Orange’s way. But that didn’t continue for the rest of the game. AdvertisementThis is placeholder text“We don’t really play well against this team,” DiGirolamo said. “We wanted to come and get a good start at the beginning, just to make sure we got some confidence going.”Despite a late breakaway after a cross-ice Shelby Calof pass, the Orange failed to light the lamp a second time in the opening period. Eight and a half minutes after DiGirolamo’s opening goal, the score remained 1-0.While coach Paul Flanagan criticized the team’s fundamentals and work ethic, he admitted a bigger first period could have changed the game’s dynamic.“Obviously in hindsight it probably would have been a different ball game if we get up two or three,” Flanagan said. “Maybe they get back on their heels.”Despite first period dominance, Flanagan said he didn’t necessarily think his squad deserved more than what they got.“I thought we missed the net a lot,” Flanagan said. “We were shooting wide and we were shooting high.”Ignoring the missed opportunities, having a lead is never a bad thing. It was only the third time this season Syracuse has finished the first period leading. But coming out of the locker room to play the remaining 40 minutes, it quickly became apparent the Orange hadn’t gotten enough.RIT would out-score SU in the second period 3-2, then pile on four more scores in the final frame.“We came back out in the second, we wanted to do the same things,” DiGirolamo said. “But things didn’t go our way.” Comments Published on November 2, 2019 at 12:16 am Contact Mitchell: mbannon@syr.edu Facebook Twitter Google+last_img read more