Physicists Demonstrate QubitQutrit Entanglement

first_imgFor the first time, physicists have entangled a qubit with a “qutrit” – the 3D version of the 2D qubit. Qubit-qutrit entanglement could lead to advantages in quantum computing, such as increased security and more efficient quantum gates, as well as enable novel tests of quantum mechanics. Explore further Coupling qubits to sound in a multimode cavity Citation: Physicists Demonstrate Qubit-Qutrit Entanglement (2008, February 26) retrieved 18 August 2019 from https://phys.org/news/2008-02-physicists-qubit-qutrit-entanglement.html This document is subject to copyright. Apart from any fair dealing for the purpose of private study or research, no part may be reproduced without the written permission. The content is provided for information purposes only. The research team, composed of physicists from the University of Queensland, the University of Bristol, and the University of Waterloo, has published its results in a recent issue of Physical Review Letters. The researchers made qutrits with biphotons (two correlated photons), resulting in “biphotonic qutrits.” Then, they entangled these qutrits with photonic qubits (made with one photon) using a combination of linear optic elements and measurements.A qutrit, just as it sounds, is the quantum information analogue of the classical trit. Due to its quantum mechanical nature, a qutrit can exist in superpositions of its three basis states. This is similar to how a qubit can exist in superpositions of its two states. Because of the qutrit’s 3D nature, though, it can carry much more information than the qubit. (A string of n classical bits holds 1n states, a string of n qubits holds 2n states, and a string of n qutrits holds 3n states.)Many researchers have investigated the possibilities of entangling a qubit and qutrit, hoping to develop a valuable tool for improving quantum computing and exploring novel quantum phenomena, among other things. The authors’ result now makes such theoretical proposals experimentally testable.“For me, the significance our paper is about how entangling systems to a qubit can be a great way to manipulate that system,” co-author Benjamin Lanyon of the University of Queensland told PhysOrg.com. “In our example, we use this technique to dramatically extend the range of possible transforms on qutrits – these higher dimensional quantum information carriers, which offer loads of advantages, but are otherwise really difficult to handle.”In their study, the researchers show that qubit-qutrit entanglement can be a useful resource to manipulate the difficult-to-handle qutrits. The scientists built a non-linear qutrit polarizer, which involves creation of the entanglement and destructive measurement of the qubit. The result is to temporarily remove a single qutrit state from the qutrit’s superposition. Lanyon explains that this is an example of a measurement-induced nonlinearity (MINL), which is known to be an extremely powerful tool to manipulate qubits and realize an optical quantum computer. “Measurements on the output of optical circuits built from only linear elements (such as beamsplitters, phase shifters and mirrors) can give rise to a non-linear evolution of the input optical field, i.e. for all intents and proposes, the photons seem to have interacted,” said Lanyon. “This is surprising, since photons do not naturally interact in these systems, and the effect is called a measurement-induced nonlinearity. In the context of our study, the MINL gives rise to the non-linear evolution required to generate entanglement and remove a single logical state from a qutrit superposition.”He also gave a visual description. “Consider that there are a number of different paths that the photons could take through the optical circuit,” he said. “As in the double-slit experiment with electrons, the photons take all these paths at once, and, at the output, we end up with a large superposition. Now let’s make a measurement of the whole (or part) of the output state. Certain results mean that certain paths were not taken – and therefore we can get rid of paths this way, conditional on getting certain measurement outcomes. Very clever measurements can leave you with a path history that results in entanglement.”The researchers also propose a number of extensions to their work. For example, a pair of entangled qubit-qutrit states could be used to create qutrit-qutrit entanglement, which would first require entangling the two qubits. High-brightness single-photon sources currently in development will help with these kinds of future experiments. The researchers also propose that using MINLs as a manipulation technique is not limited to photons, but can be applied to any type of bosonic quantum information carrier.The scientists predict that higher dimensional entanglement will have applications including optimizing security in quantum information systems, and increasing channel capacity for quantum communication, among other uses. More information: Lanyon, B. P., Weinhold, T. J., Langford, N. K., O’Brien, J. L., Resch, K. J., Gilchrist, A., and White, A. G. “Manipulating Biphotonic Qutrits.” Physical Review Letters 100, 060504 (2008).Copyright 2008 PhysOrg.com. All rights reserved. This material may not be published, broadcast, rewritten or redistributed in whole or part without the express written permission of PhysOrg.com.last_img read more

Scientists Fabricate Organic Transistor with Improved Performance

Scientists Fabricate Organic Transistor with Improved Performance

first_img To address this issue, a team of researchers from Stanford University in the US, the Samsung Advanced Institute of Technology in Korea, and Sungkyunkwan University in Korea, has greatly improved the performance of n-channel organic semiconductors in transistors. They demonstrate that their transistor achieves the highest mobility for n-channel organic wire transistors known to date, and is comparable with the best p-channel organic wire transistors. Their fabrication method offers controlled alignment and density of the wires, which helps improve the overall device performance. The results are published in a recent issue of PNAS.“N-channel transistors are needed for complimentary circuits consisting of both p- and n-channel transistors,” coauthor Zhenan Bao of Stanford University told PhysOrg.com. “Such circuits consume less power and are easier to design then the ones with p-channel transistors only. They are less common because electrons flowing in these transistors are easily trapped by ambient oxygen and moisture. Therefore, special molecular design and synthesis is needed and only a few classes of molecules show good air-stable n-channel performance.”In their fabrication approach, the researchers used a solution fabrication method to assemble the organic microwires. Certain organic conjugated molecules, when placed in a hot concentrated solution, readily assemble into wires upon cooling or addition of a “bad” solvent (a solvent that the molecule is not readily soluble in). By controlling the cooling speed and solvent mixing ratio, the researchers could tune the diameter of the wire (in the range of tens of nanometers) and the length of the wire (from several millimeters to several tens of micrometers). Upon completion, the microwires exhibited a structurally perfect single-crystalline nature, with different locations of the same wire showing the same diffraction pattern geometry. In addition, the orientation of the molecules (pi-stacking) along the long axis of the microwires improved the wires’ charge transport efficiency, and overall wire performance.Next, the researchers used a filtration-and-transfer (FAT) alignment method to control the alignment and density of the microwires being deposited on the transistors. In general, organic microwires are difficult to work with due to their fragility, and they’re easily damaged by handling. In the FAT method, the microwires are aligned by fluid flow through a mask in a simple vacuum filtration setup. The method could successfully produce dense films of aligned and undamaged microwires, which is important for achieving a high and uniform current. Unlike most other assembly methods, the FAT method could also create multiple microwire patterns in different directions, simply by using an appropriate mask. As the researchers explained, the high mobility of the new n-channel organic transistors can be attributed to the high level of structural perfection of the microwires, along with good alignment and high density of the microwires on the transistors. Hopefully, this approach will lead to the fabrication of high-performance organic electronic devices, in addition to the transistors shown here. Zhenan added that solar cells and sensors are potential devices, and that the method should be applicable to inorganic nano- and microwire alignment, as well.More information: Joon Hak Oh, et al. “Solution-processed, high-performance n-channel organic microwire transistors.” PNAS, April 14, 2009, vol. 106, no. 15, 6065-6070.Copyright 2009 PhysOrg.com. All rights reserved. This material may not be published, broadcast, rewritten or redistributed in whole or part without the express written permission of PhysOrg.com. (PhysOrg.com) — Organic semiconductors are promising building blocks for many devices, from LEDs to transistors, offering potential advantages such as cost-effectiveness, flexibility, and high performance. Currently, most research in organic semiconductors has focused on p-channel semiconductors, which transport positively charged holes, rather than n-channel semiconductors, which transport negatively charged electrons. The choice of semiconductor depends on the application, and many applications require a combination of both types. However, the few n-channel semiconductors that exist today have performance that lags considerably behind their p-channel counterparts. Scanning electron microscope images of (left) microwires synthesized using the researchers’ method (inset is the chemical structure of the molecules); and (right) aligned microwires on a substrate (inset is the corresponding optical image). Credit: Oh et al. ©2009 PNAS. Explore further Citation: Scientists Fabricate Organic Transistor with Improved Performance (2009, April 24) retrieved 18 August 2019 from https://phys.org/news/2009-04-scientists-fabricate-transistor.html Speedier flexible electronics possible with new fabrication process This document is subject to copyright. Apart from any fair dealing for the purpose of private study or research, no part may be reproduced without the written permission. The content is provided for information purposes only.last_img read more

Augmented Reality Science Fiction or Reality w Video

Augmented Reality Science Fiction or Reality w Video

first_img(PhysOrg.com) — Computer graphics have come a long way since the birth of Atari Games over 30 years ago. Today, computer graphics seem very real and some day researchers will pull graphics out of your television or computer display and integrate them into real-world environments. By using Nvidia’s new Tegra platform, the game’s maps are generated by pointing the phones camera at a 2D drawing printout lying on a table. The end result shows a realistic 3D world with buildings popping up, as players move the real world around the game map placed on the table. Motion controlled devices for Nintendo Wii and Microsoft’s new Natal platform are already being used to enhance gamers experience. By using the Natal platform, as the control mechanism, body movements can easily be converted into game movements. The ultimate goal would be to merge game graphics with the real world. The day will come when video games are played outdoors and project into the real world around us. In the future augmented reality will have a more profound effect on the way in which we develop and interact with computers.Via: PCAuthority© 2009 PhysOrg.com This document is subject to copyright. Apart from any fair dealing for the purpose of private study or research, no part may be reproduced without the written permission. The content is provided for information purposes only. This new technology, called augmented reality or AR, will further disguise what’s real and what’s computer-generated by enhancing what we see, hear, feel and smell.Up until now AR has been used extensively in movies and been mostly confined to Hollywood. Today, it’s now possible to shoot augmented reality by using only a mobile phone.The video below demonstrates basic AR in action. The AR scene involves an AR shooter shooting at zombies and using skittles as bombs to blow up zombies. Security Alert: Beware of SMS Messages That Can Take Control of Your Phone Explore further Citation: Augmented Reality: Science Fiction or Reality? (w/ Video) (2009, July 7) retrieved 18 August 2019 from https://phys.org/news/2009-07-augmented-reality-science-fiction-video.htmllast_img read more

What Comes After Hard Drives

What Comes After Hard Drives

first_imgAn opened Samsung HD753LJ hard disk drive. Researchers predict that, in 2020, hard disk drives will likely be less expensive on a cost per terabyte basis than any of the competing technologies. Image credit: Christian Jansky. (PhysOrg.com) — The ability to store and retrieve data is an important component of today’s computers, as well as other modern electronic devices such as cell phones, video game consoles, and camcorders. Since their invention in the 1950s, magnetic-based hard disk drives (HDDs) have been the primary method of nonvolatile storage. However, researchers are currently developing several new and promising nonvolatile memory (NVM) technologies, but for one of them to replace HDDs within the next decade, it will be a challenge. According to a new study, if HDDs continue to progress at their current pace, then in 2020 a two-disk, 2.5-inch disk drive will be capable of storing more than 14 TB and will cost about $40 (today, a typical 500 GB hard drive costs about $100). Although flash memories have also become popular – with advantages such as lower power consumption, faster read access time, and better mechanical reliability than HDDs – the cost per GB for flash memories is nearly 10 times that of HDDs. In addition, flash memory technology will reach technical limits that will prevent its continued scaling before 2020, keeping them from replacing HDDs.In a study published in a recent issue of IEEE Transactions on Magnetics, Professor Mark Kryder and PhD student Chang Soo Kim of Carnegie Mellon University have investigated 13 up-and-coming NVM technologies to see whether one of them might outperform HDDs on a cost-per-TB basis in 2020. Their results showed that most technologies will probably not be competitive with HDDs or flash memories at that time, except for two potential candidates: phase change random access memory (PCRAM) and spin transfer torque random access memory (STTRAM).As Kryder and Kim explained, PCRAM is based on the phase change properties of chalcogenide glass. With the application of heat, the glass can switch between two different states (amorphous and crystalline) to be used as a memory. With their small cell size and ability to store multiple bits per cell, PCRAMs have the potential to offer high densities and be cost-competitive with HDDs, but their biggest drawback is that they require somewhat higher power than most other technologies. PCRAMs are already beginning to be marketed by Numonyx Inc., an Intel-ST Microelectronics joint venture, and so are closer to practical realization than STTRAM.STTRAM, which is similar to magnetic RAM, uses a spin polarized current to write data by reorienting the states of a magnetic tunnel junction between parallel and anti-parallel orientations. In their evaluation, Kryder and Kim found that STTRAMs appear to potentially offer superior power efficiency, among other advantages. If STTRAMs could be improved to store multiple bits per cell, the researchers predict that STTRAMs’ density could make them candidates for replacing flash memory and possibly HDDs. Citation: What Comes After Hard Drives? (2009, October 23) retrieved 18 August 2019 from https://phys.org/news/2009-10-hard_1.html Explore furthercenter_img “We were surprised to find that the study indicated that, even in 2020, hard drives were likely to be considerably less expensive on a cost per terabyte basis than any of the competing technologies,” Kryder told PhysOrg.com. “It was also somewhat surprising to find that the technical potential of a technology was not necessarily well-correlated with where the industry was investing the most dollars; rather, industrial firms are tending to invest where they have the most know-how. This is not necessarily the wisest decision, but is quite understandable.”The other NVM technologies that Kryder and Kim evaluated were ferroelectric RAM, magnetic RAM, carbon nanotube RAM, probe memory, holographic memory, copper bridge RAM, resistive RAM, racetrack memory, single electron memory, molecular memory, and polymer memory. Although these technologies offer potential, each of them still faces significant performance challenges over the next decade. Holographic memory, for example, offers high density and is inexpensive, but it currently only offers “write once, read many times” (WORM) functionality, and with its 50-year storage lifetime it may be better suited to the archival market. The researchers also pointed out the intriguing concept behind single electron memory, where information could be stored in something as small as a single electron, but they predicted that this technology likely won’t be practical until beyond 2020.Kryder, who has previously been CTO for Seagate Technology, the world’s largest hard drive maker, explained that he had been continually asked to review new technologies that were often touted as potentially replacing hard drives. “Feedback from industrial associates has indicated that having a structured set of criteria to evaluate technologies was very useful and that the study has helped them to prioritize the technologies that they look at,” he said. “This study allowed us to identify the most promising technologies on which to work, and we are now attempting develop multi-level cell STTRAM.”More information: Mark H. Kryder and Chang Soo Kim. “After Hard Drives – What Comes Next?” IEEE Transactions on Magnetics, Vol. 45, No. 10, October 2009.Copyright 2009 PhysOrg.com. All rights reserved. This material may not be published, broadcast, rewritten or redistributed in whole or part without the express written permission of PhysOrg.com. 16 Gb Samsung’s Flash Solid State Disk to Replace Hard Drives This document is subject to copyright. Apart from any fair dealing for the purpose of private study or research, no part may be reproduced without the written permission. The content is provided for information purposes only.last_img read more

Researcher shows physics suggests life could exist in a 2D universe

Researcher shows physics suggests life could exist in a 2D universe

first_imgCredit: CC0 Public Domain Imagining the possibility of life in a universe without the weak force More information: J. H. C. Scargill. Can Life Exist in 2 + 1 Dimensions? arXiv:1906.05336 [hep-th] arxiv.org/abs/1906.05336 James Scargill, a physicist at the University of California, has written a paper reporting that the laws of physics allow for the existence of a life-supporting two-dimensional universe. MIT’s Technology Review has reviewed the paper and found that the work does show that such a 2+1 universe could exist. © 2019 Science X Network Because we live in three-dimensions, it is difficult for us to envision a universe in which the third dimension does not exist—or one in which there is a fourth or fifth dimension. But philosophers and physicists have spent a lot of time and work trying to figure out if life could exist in anything but the three dimensions we know. In such discussions, time is also included, which has led to the description of what we experience as a 3+1-dimensional universe.As TR notes, most physicists have concluded that our 3+1-dimensional universe is the only one that could support life. They point out that with more than three dimensions, Newton’s laws of motion would be susceptible to problems with tiny perturbations, which would prevent the formation of orbits—like planets around a sun. So that is out. But what about a two-dimensional world? Most experts suggest it is difficult to imagine how gravity could work in such a universe, making it difficult or impossible for life-supporting systems to form. In his paper, Scargill suggests we might need to rethink this argument. He has shown that the laws of physics do allow for gravity in a 2-D world, and also the development of systems capable of supporting life.In his paper, Scargill uses physics formulas to show that scaler gravitational fields could exist in two dimensions—and goes on to show that the necessary complexity needed for life could also exist in a 2-D universe—and he does it using neural networks as a basis for comparison. He starts by exploring whether there are any 2-D networks that have all the same characteristics as a neural network. He then shows that 2-D networks can be built in modular fashion to overcome the problem of crossing edges. Then he shows that such networks can demonstrate criticality. And by doing so, he demonstrates that there could exist a life-supporting 2-D+1 universe—at least according to physics. Explore further Citation: Researcher shows physics suggests life could exist in a 2-D universe (2019, June 25) retrieved 18 August 2019 from https://phys.org/news/2019-06-physics-life-d-universe.html This document is subject to copyright. Apart from any fair dealing for the purpose of private study or research, no part may be reproduced without the written permission. The content is provided for information purposes only.last_img read more

Stress in Childhood and Adulthood Have Combined Impact on Hormones and Health

first_imgThe researchers specifically wanted to understand howstressful events affect the brain’s stress-response system later in life. Is itthe total amount of stress experienced across the lifespan that matters? Or doesexposure to stress during sensitive periods of development, specifically in earlychildhood, have the biggest impact?   Young and colleagues wanted to investigate a thirdpossibility: Early childhood stress makes our stress-response system moresensitive to stressors that emerge later in life. For thestudy, Young and colleagues examined data from 90 individuals whowere part of a high-risk birth cohort participating in the Minnesota LongitudinalStudy of Risk and Adaptation. At age 37, the participants also provided daily cortisol dataover a 2-day period. They collected a saliva sample immediately when they wokeup and again 30 minutes and 1 hour later; they also took samples in theafternoon and before going to bed. They sent the saliva samples to a lab for cortisol-leveltesting. “What we find is that the amount of a person’s exposure toearly life stress plays an important role in the development of unhealthypatterns of cortisol release. However, this is only true if individuals alsoare experiencing higher levels of current stress, indicating that thecombination of higher early life stress and higher current life stress leads tothe most unhealthy cortisol profiles,” says psychological scientist Ethan Young,a researcher at the University of Minnesota. The researchers grouped participants’ LES scores into specificperiods: early childhood (1-5 years), middle childhood (Grades 1-6),adolescence (16 and 17 years), early adulthood (23-34 years), and current (37years). The researchers also investigated whether life stress inmiddle childhood, adolescence, and early adulthood were associated with adultcortisol patterns, and found no meaningful relationships. Young and colleagues note that cortisol is one part of thehuman stress-response system, and they hope to investigate how othercomponents, such as the microbiome in our gut, also play a role in long-termhealth outcomes. The researchers found that neither total life stress nor early childhood stress predicted cortisol level patterns at age 37. Rather, cortisol patterns depended on both early childhood stress and stress at age 37. Participants who experienced relatively low levels of stress in early childhood showed relatively similar cortisol patterns regardless of their stress level in adulthood. On the other hand, participants who had been exposed to relatively high levels of early childhood stress showed flatter daily cortisol patterns, but only if they also reported high levels of stress as adults. One of the ways that our brain responds to daily stressors isby releasing a hormone called cortisol — typically, our cortisol levels peak inthe morning and gradually decline throughout the day. But sometimes this systemcan become dysregulated, resulting in a flatter cortisol pattern that is associatedwith negative health outcomes. The researchers assessed data from the Life Events Schedule(LES), which surveys individuals’ stressful life events, including financialtrouble, relationship problems, and physical danger and mortality. Trained codersrate the level of disruption of each event on a scale from 0 to 3 to create anoverall score for that measurement period. The participants’ mothers completed theinterview when the participants were 12, 18, 30, 42, 48, 54, and 64 months old;when they were in Grades 1, 2, 3, and 6; and when they were 16 and 17 years old.The participants completed the LES themselves when they were 23, 26, 28, 32,34, and 37 years old. These findings suggest that early childhood may be aparticularly sensitive time in which stressful life events — such as thoserelated to trauma or poverty — can calibrate the brain’s stress-responsesystem, with health consequences that last into adulthood. Coauthors on the research include Allison K. Farrell, Elizabeth A. Carlson, Michelle M. Englund, Gregory E. Miller, Megan R. Gunnar, Glenn I. Roisman, Jeffry A. Simpson. Adults who report high levels of stress and who also hadstressful childhoods are most likely to show hormone patterns associated withnegative health outcomes, according to findings published in Psychological Science,a journal of the Association for PsychologicalScience. This project was supported by a NationalInstitute on Aging grant (No. R01 AG039453) awarded to J. A. Simpson, whichsupported the most recent assessments of the Minnesota Longitudinal Study ofRisk and Adaptation.last_img read more

Hush it up

Hush it up

first_imgIf not censor board but Ramesh Sippy, the director had his way, the 1975 classic Sholay would have had a climax where no police officer comes to the rescue of the dacoit Gabbar; where Thakur could take his revenge on his own. But that was not to be. So, Sholay took a different trail in history up till early 90’s when the director’s cut came out, revealing two different climax scenes. Whatever the reasons: emergency, or the state’s and censors’ belief that a violent climax would instigate people to take up law in their hands; several other films in cinemas history took to a path those were not set out for. Violence in Indian cinema and profanities used in it, dominated the day at the 100 years celebration of Indian Cinema at Siri fort Auditorium, on Friday. Also Read – ‘Playing Jojo was emotionally exhausting’An eminent group of panelists including renowned directors, Vishal Bhardwaj and Ramesh Sippy graced the occasion with their presence. They took to a discourse on On Screen violence and the Culture of Cuss Words. Setting the tone for the discussion, K.Hariharan, the director of LV Prasad Film and TV academy in Chennai, presided over a workshop on the said subject in the morning session and showcased the uncut scenes of a number of Indian movies.The interaction was simmering with the audiences’ outrage. Complaints kept pouring out at the directors’, from right left and centre for the use of violence and expletives in cinema. What started off as an accusatory affair, took a turn in between, with takes from censor board executives and directors’ on issues that make violence imperative in cinema. Pankaja Thakur, the Chief Executive Officer of Central Board of Film Certification, questioned Vishal on introducing MCBC, the expletives in Also Read – Leslie doing new comedy special with NetflixOmkara. To this Vishal nonchalantly answered that he only mainstreamed those words. He made the Bollywood heroes use them, but theatre artists at NSD do it all the time. And nobody is to blame because he comes from a Delhi where a father calls out his son saying, ‘Oye Kaminey! Come here.’ Viewers need to understand the meanings associated with words and not take them on face value. Vishal who confesses that the movie Bandit Queen is his bible, went onto share an anecdote. During the release of Kaminey, the censor board asked him, ‘What kind of title was Kaminey?’. Smiling profusely he said, thankfully to his rescue, Gulzar wrote the title track ‘Meri aarzoo kaminey, Meri dost bhi Kaminey’ for the film, explaining the subtext associated with the word. Ramesh Sippy chipped in saying, in an age where a telephone company sells its chip with a tagline ‘Har ek dost kamina hota he’, and all of us lap it up; it’s too much to indict filmakers with the charge. Hariharan gave another spin to the tale, he asked the audience if they had read a poem – ‘Baba black sheep have you ay wool’. And ofcourse all of us by heart the rhyme as children. But not all of us know that it has racist subtext. Perhaps, cinema has come of age and now demands better understanding. The discussion swayed to this juncture where directors pointed that audience also need to understand the aesthetics of craft and not hold on to certain words. For now, filmmakers want better comprehension of their art, believing that they have due share of responsibility in reflecting the contemporary state of society.last_img read more

Islamic treasure

Islamic treasure

first_imgThe visual art of writing will unveil in all its vintage glory for heritage lovers in the Capital, as National Museum opens an exhibition on calligraphy with focus on its Islamic stream dating back to five centuries.A total of 56 utility artefacts from NM’s collection will be on display at the show titled Art of Calligraphy and Beyond: Arabic-Persian Inscriptions on Decorative Arts objects, which will be inaugurated by Union Minister of state for Tourism and Culture Mahesh Sharma on May 15. Curated by NM officials Anamika Pathak and Zahid Ali Ansari, the 59-day show will portray the aesthetics of Arabic-Persian inscriptions known for their tasteful blend with flora-fauna designs that add to charm of the objects — the oldest among which is from 1494 AD. Naseem Akhtar, an authority on Arabic-Persian language, has transcribed all the inscriptions on the exhibits. Also Read – ‘Playing Jojo was emotionally exhausting’NM’s Director-General Sanjiv Mittal noted that the upcoming exhibition assumes significance, considering that fancy lettering of a script has been one of the most important aspects of certain cultures. “The highlight of the show is that it has inscriptions on metal-ware, wood, textiles and semi-precious stones,” he added.Pathak, who is curator (decorative arts), said artefacts at the exhibition are one that were crafted for daily, ceremonial and religious uses from a variety of materials like ivory, jade, ceramic, textile, wood, metal, glass, paper, leather and bone.These artefacts have been arranged, as per their utilities, into five main groups; writing implements, religion, faith, tradition and trade.last_img read more

Firhad Hakim to inaugurate Mishti Hub on July 5

Firhad Hakim to inaugurate Mishti Hub on July 5

first_imgKolkata: State Urban Development minister Firhad Hakim will inaugurate the Mishti Hub in New Town on July 5.The hub, which will give buyers an opportunity to have sweets made by branded manufacturers under one roof, is the only of its kind in Bengal.A high level meeting between the sweet manufacturers and senior officials of Housing Infrastructure Development Corporation (HIDCO), was held on Thursday to fix the integrities.The meeting was chaired by Debashis Sen, chairman of HIDCO. It has been decided that the Mishti Hub will remain open from 12 noon to 9 pm. It is coming up next to Eco Park. The hub will give an opportunity to tourists who want to carry the famous mouth watering sweets back home. Also Read – Heavy rain hits traffic, flightsProper signs will be put up on Biswa Bangla Sarani, to facilitate the airport bound buyers. There will be a car parking facility for the buyers as well. The residents of New Town will get an opportunity to get the best of sweets at their doorsteps. Special steps will be taken by the New Town Kolkata Development Authority (NKDA) to issue trade licence to the owners of shops at the Mishti Hub on Monday and Tuesday.The 10 branded shops that will be set up at the Mishti Hub are in the following order: KC Das (shop no. 1), Bancharam (shop no. 2), Gupta Brothers (shop no. 3), Balaram Mullick and Radharaman Mullick (shop no. 4), Ganguram Sweets (shop no. 5), Nalin Chandra Das (shop no. 6), Mithai (shop no. 7), Sweet Bengal (shop no. 8), New Nabakrishna Guin (shop no. 9) and Hindusthan Sweets (shop no. 10). Also Read – Speeding Jaguar crashes into Merc, 2 B’deshi bystanders killedHIDCO had imposed a condition that those opening shops at the hub must have experience of 25 years ormore.A central atrium with glass walls will bring the sunlight inside. There is a driveway and a free parking lot for a limited period of 30 minutes. The construction of the hub has been done as a combination of tradition and modernity.There will be a caretaker on behalf of HIDCO, to look after the facilities. The hub has been built on a shop-in-shop concept. There is a potential market of Bengali sweets both in the country and abroad.last_img read more

Famous mathematician KC Nags 125th birthday to be celebrated in grand way

Famous mathematician KC Nags 125th birthday to be celebrated in grand way

first_imgKolkata: Whenever we talk of the subject Mathematics in our school days, we only tend to recollect the difficulties we faced while comprehending a sum about a monkey climbing up and slipping down a greased bamboo pole or water going in and coming outof a cistern.Perhaps, there is not a single person among us, who will be able to dissociate the Mathematics book by Keshab Chandra Nag, popularly known as KC Nag in our school days.The Mitra Institution in Bhowanipore, where KC Nag had been a teacher from 1924 to 1960, will be celebrating his 125th birth anniversary in a grand way as a tribute to him on Friday. A memorial book on KC Nag will be published, which will focus on the various aspects of his life. Also Read – Speeding Jaguar crashes into Merc, 2 B’deshi bystanders killedNag was born at Gurap in Hooghly, around 125 years ago, on the day of Rathyatra (July 10, 1893) and his books on Mathematics are still very popular among students from Class V to Class X.”By the end of this month, we will hold a memorial lecture on the great mathematician,” said Asit Baran Giri, the headmaster of Mitra Institution, Bhowanipore.Nag had passed the ISC examinations on 1914 with first division marks. He then graduated with Mathematics, Sanskrit and Arts and joined Krishnanath Collegiate School in Berhampore as a Mathematics teacher. Also Read – Naihati: 10 councillors return to TMC from BJPImpressed with his teachings, Sir Ashutosh Mukhopadhyay brought him to Kolkata and introduced him as a teacher of Mitra Institution.He became the headmaster of the school in 1956 and served the post till 1960.Noted personalities like Hemanta Mukhopadhyay, Subhas Mukherjee, Tarun Banerjee, Arjun Sengupta, Siddharta Shankar Ray to name a few were his students.Apart from his skills in Mathematics, he had a knack to serve the common people, which he had inherited from the then principal of Ramkrishna Math and Mission Vishuddhananda Maharaj, who he regarded as his guru. He was a disciple of Ma Sarada Devi. From 1925 to 1980, he wrote his diary named Ratna Bedi that contained many poems, songs, and jokes. He also took part in the Freedom Movement. He went to jail after participating in Mahatma Gandhi’s “Quit India” movement.The most interesting aspect associated with his life was his avid interest in sports – like cricket, football and tennis. He was a life member of Mohun Bagan club.His love for cricket also led to his bad helath. On February 1, 1985, he suffered a cerebral attack due to tension while watching a test match between India and England.He survived for two years after the attack but died on February 6, 1987.last_img read more