Millennials think corporations need a conscience

first_imgAt Network for Good, we were recently trying to figure out what to call a new section of our site that will help nonprofits navigate the world of social networks. We bandied about terms like “social networking,” “social media,” Web 2.0.” We were stuck because we think most people don’t say any of this. They say things like “Facebook and YouTube” or “what people younger (than I) are doing online.” And they say it with awe and confusion. I understand the awe and confusion. We nonprofits think in terms of the people using social networks, and we think of them as people other than us. They acquire a certain scary mystique that stumps our marketing minds.Cone has some slightly old but still valid research about these younguns – aka “millenials” – that is worth sharing. Millenials include “teens” (13-17), “college” (18-22) and “young adults” (22-25) in Cone’s online survey. Cone’s main finding was this is a very socially conscious group of people – far more focused on causes at a young age than my aimless Generation X, and they reflect those values when buying things. As a firm involved in cause-related marketing, Cone has an interest in doing this type of study and showing this kind of result, but that shouldn’t detract from these findings, which seem very solid to me. Thanks Cone for sharing them. You can read more here.1. Millenials are skeptical of marketers. They will not respond to products or services that don’t seem genuine.2. A way to gain their trust as a corporate marketer is to align with good causes, but few companies do so. 61% of millenials are worried about the world and want to make a difference, and 81% volunteered in the past year. 70% of millenials believe companies don’t do enough to support good causes.3. To reach these consumers, traditional marketing needs to evolve. Companies need to create a new generation of fiercely loyal customers passionate about working with corporations to change the world. 83% say they will trust a company more if it is socially and environmentally responsible. 69% say they consider a company’s social and environmental commitment when deciding where to shop, and 89% would switch brands if price and quality were the same if the second brand was associated with a good cause.So what does this mean to us?Bring this research to your next appointment with a corporate partner. It can help make the case for why a company should support you.If you do get a new corporate partner, don’t forget #1 — these millenials are skeptical. Cause-related marketing needs to be genuine, and in your partnership, you need to be clear about EXACTLY HOW the corporate partner supports you and how much of a purchase benefits your cause. Cause-related marketing can be a boon or backfire depending on your degree of honesty and transparency.PS – Read more about reaching Millenials here. (Thanks Mark for the head’s up.)last_img read more

Miami tackle Gerald Willis III isnt considered a

Miami tackle Gerald Willis III isnt considered a

first_img Miami tackle Gerald Willis III isn’t considered a top-five defensive lineman in the 2019 NFL Draft. It’s a position group with a great deal of depth in this year’s class, and because of that the Arizona Cardinals might believe his talent is undervalued.The Cardinals, according to NFL Network’s Ian Rapoport, are hosting Willis on Tuesday.A member of the Associated Press All-America Second Team in 2018, he made 59 tackles, 18 for loss, and 4.0 sacks. Top Stories Derrick Hall satisfied with D-backs’ buying and selling They already have hosted potential first-round pick Jeffery Simmons, a tackle out of Mississippi State. Like Willis, he also had past character issues.In both cases, it’s easy to guess that Arizona is using some of its allotted 30 prospect visits for longer sit downs with players devalued because of character issues. Former Cardinals kicker Phil Dawson retires Grace expects Greinke trade to have emotional impactcenter_img It was a breakout year for Willis, a high-profile high school recruit who signed with the Florida Gators in 2014. He was dismissed from the team his freshman year after multiple suspensions, and a transfer to Miami didn’t immediately remedy those character red flags.Willis sat out 2015 due to transfer rules and made 19 tackles, 5.5 for loss, as a reserve in 2016 before stepping away from the team in 2017 due to personal reasons. He returned as a redshirt senior to produce big numbers for the Hurricanes in 2018.Related LinksReport: Potential 1st-round pick Jeffery Simmons to visit CardinalsIs confidence in Cardinals taking Kyler Murray atop NFL Draft waning?Report: Cardinals take a look at late-round NFL Draft prospectsThe 6-foot-2, 302-pound Willis apparently got things right. A one-gap 3-technique, he’s an explosive athlete who pushed his way back into draft consideration.WalterFootball.com ranks him as the eighth-best defensive tackle in the draft, and he’s viewed by some as a second-round choice. Others, like NFL.com’s Lance Zierlein, believes Willis is more of a third- or fourth-round option.For Arizona, interest in Willis makes sense. Though the Cardinals signed Darius Philon and re-signed Rodney Gunter to join veteran Corey Peters, depth is an issue at defensive line.And as the Cardinals keep other NFL teams in the dark about whether they’ll draft quarterback Kyler Murray or defensive linemen Nick Bosa or Quinnen Williams with the No. 1 pick, hosting a few defensive linemen who are later-round options only makes their current intentions more unclear. Miami defensive tackle Gerald Willis, front, runs through the tackling dummies as defensive end Joe Jackson stretches at the NCAA college football team’s NFL Pro Day in Miami, Monday, March, 25, 2019. (Charles Trainor Jr./Miami Herald via AP) 11 Comments   Share   The 5: Takeaways from the Coyotes’ introduction of Alex Meruelolast_img read more