Being Creative With Curated Content

first_img“We’re not databasing all of their content,” he says. “We monitor their website for changes, and what we database is the delta. Anyone can go to a law firm’s website and see how many partners are there. The value is in knowing how that’s different from last week. It’s not relevant unless there’s analysis behind it.”ALM’s analysis is in the aggregate. A customizable dashboard sits behind the news feed that allows users to quantify industry trends with sortable lists. The company added a data visualization component in January with charts and graphs.The Human ElementWhile RivalEdge can be fully automated, there’s value in maintaining a human layer. Categorizing a large portion of any industry en masse would be a challenge for a software program, Iredell says, especially in a segment like legal services that has its own non-standardized jargon.“You have one law firm that’s ‘copyright and patent,’ and another whose practice area is ‘intellectual property,’” he says. “They’re really the same thing, but you’re not going to get a hit when you try to do an apples-to-apples comparison or a Google search on those particular keywords.”ALM editorial staff sifted through about 1,000 practice areas, paring them down to 27 before automating the search process from there. That formula is present throughout RivalEdge. There isn’t an editorial slant to ALM’s curation, but the human element is an integral piece. Editors ultimately determine what gets distributed and databased.ALM also provides a crowdsourcing admin tool for subscribers to request coverage of a specific firm or area of practice. Staff will review and add the request within 24 hours. Close to 20 percent of the 750 firms the platform monitors came this way, Iredell says. SIDEBARCuration: Identifying the right usesZiff Davis uses curation in the more traditional editorial sense, finding and linking to stories across the web from its own homepages, but its managed to improve traffic back to its own sites by leading with original, high-value content.Used primarily by the publisher’s tech-focused b-to-b brands, Ziff Davis has used the PublishThis platform to boost return visits to its sites by 105x.Steve Horowitz, COO of Ziff Davis, attributes that growth directly to the increased volume of content his team is able to put up now.The key to quality growth has been in recognizing how to leverage the platform appropriately. News is usually curated at the bottom of the page on a rapid daily cycle, while enterprise articles sit above, refreshed on more of a weekly basis. In-depth whitepapers are above that, with community posts, “popular” items and promotions alongside.While the numbers are up as a whole, that specificity can make comparisons between the sections difficult. There are a variety of expectations associated with each of those types of stories.“The content is a little too different to say we’re seeing interaction with one more than another,” he says. “We’d expect engagement with [news, articles and whitepapers] to be different.” The argument for content curation has always been one of efficiency. It allows you to cover more ground, in less time.Companies are finding opportunities to get creative with the process though as more media bring some form of curation into their mix and it officially becomes part of a new content troika, along with original and user-generated streams. ALM has had success bringing curation to its legal intelligence database. The company acquired the “listening” platform RivalEdge for an undisclosed amount in September as its first purchase under new CEO Bill Carter.Like a traditional curation service, RivalEdge draws information from the open web and distributes it to a base of readers—a subscriber base of law firms who pay about $20,000 per year, in ALM’s case. Unlike most curation services, ALM records and catalogs that information. They aren’t logging everything though, says Kevin Iredell, vice president of research and continuing education products for ALM, just the changes.last_img read more

Hubitats smart home works without the internet

first_img Mentioned Above Google Home See It News • Black Mirror season 5 has three new trailers to stress you out today The best of smart home at CES 2019 Walmart Google Home Smart home product compatibility: Choose a smart home platform and see which products work with it.Best smart home devices for 2019: Hand-picked by CNET’s experts. Review • Google Home is better than ever, but you probably shouldn’t buy it 52 Photos Now playing: Watch this: Comments Aug 30 • Battling bot vacs: iRobot Roomba S9+ vs Neato Botvac D7 Connected See it CNET may get a commission from retail offers. Preview • For your consideration: Google Home seeks employment as your family’s Rosie the robot 16:33 $69 reading • Hubitat’s smart home works without the internet 4 How To • Make Google Home get your groceries Crutchfield $79 CNET Smart Home • Aug 31 • The best coffee grinders you can buy right now Aug 31 • Alexa can tell you if someone breaks into your house Aug 31 • Best smart light bulbs for 2019 (plus switches, light strips, accessories and more) Check out all the smart home products at CES 2019 See It CNET Smart Home Share your voice Hubitat At first glance, the Hubitat Elevation struck me as a pretty standard smart home hub. It has Zigbee and Z-Wave built in so it can communicate with a variety of connected gadgets. You can set up rules so one of your devices can trigger another — a motion sensor might flash your smart lights. You can group your devices by room and create scenes so multiple devices turn on at once with a single command. All of those features are pretty standard for hubs such as the SmartThings Hub. Hubitat’s main selling point is a pretty interesting twist on the smart hub formula — it processes everything locally. After the initial setup, Hubitat stores certain device data and automation recipes on the device itself. This should theoretically result in your smart home reacting more quickly to your commands, since they don’t need to head to the cloud and back. It also means that if the internet goes down, your smart home can keep functioning.Local processing isn’t entirely new either, as SmartThings offers it with certain devices and automations, but Hubitat wants to take the feature one step further by making all of its automations local — from rules to geofencing. Hubitat officially debuted a new, trimmed-down version of its Elevation home automation hub on Wednesday. You can order it now from the company’s site for $100 for a limited time. Its normal price will be $150 (about £115 or AU$210) after the introductory price expires. You’ll be able to order the Hubitat Elevation on Amazon as well starting Friday. In addition to offering the same processing power in a smaller frame, Hubitat is introducing apps for its system for both iOS and Android. You currently have to use a web browser to access your Hubitat system. The apps are still in the works, but are roughly expected to launch by April.The Elevation also works with Amazon’s assistant Alexa and the competing Google Assistant, so you can control any devices synced to the hub with a voice command to your Amazon Echo or Google Home smart speaker. Bear in mind, since those smart speakers rely on the cloud, that functionality won’t work without the internet.Since the Elevation Hub processes information locally, it could be a better fit for privacy minded individuals who still want smart home gadgets. In addition to keeping most of your info off of the cloud, Hubitat offers a customizable rules platform and invites users to develop and share their own code for any missing functionality. It looks to be aimed more at avid DIYers who like to tinker as opposed to someone less proficient in tech who just wants something to work out of the box. Most of Hubitat’s advantages come from setting up your own rules and scenes. That said, the app should help make the platform more widely applicable and user friendly. Since the Elevation will work with some Lowe’s Iris sensors, it could provide a nice new hub for those in need once Iris fully shuts down in March.  $99 Tags Amazon Google Smart Home See Alllast_img read more

Forest Dept imposes Rs 5 lakh fine on NCERT for cutting of

Forest Dept imposes Rs 5 lakh fine on NCERT for cutting of

first_imgNew Delhi: A fine of over Rs 5 lakh has been imposed on the NCERT for heavily pruning 33 trees and cutting five without permission from the Forest Department of Delhi government inside its campus on Aurobindo road here, an official said on Monday.Acting on a complaint from an NGO on August 7, a team of forest rangers visited the campus of the National Council of Educational Research and Training (NCERT) and found that five trees were cut and 33 heavily pruned, the Forest Department official said. Also Read – Rain batters Kolkata, cripples normal lifeUnder the Delhi Preservation of Trees Act, permission from authorities is required for cutting and even pruning of trees.The official said the NCERT campus had applied for permission to cut and prune trees, but before the Forest Department could take a look into the application, the trees were pruned and some cut.A report was submitted on August 8 by the forest rangers who visited the spot and a decision has been taken to impose a fine of over Rs 5 lakh on the NCERT registrar for the cutting of trees, the official said, adding that the case has been compounded. Also Read – Speeding Jaguar crashes into Mercedes car in Kolkata, 2 pedestrians killedComplainant Verhaen Khanna said the fine should be a lesson for everyone and it would have cost way less if the authorities concerned had just waited for grant of permission from the Forest Department.”A whole row of trees along the fence were heavily pruned and there were eucalyptus and semal trees among the ones that were chopped,” he said.The NCERT has, however, claimed that the trees were cut under the “occupation” of the National Institute of Educational Planning and Administration which is a separate entity. A few days ago, the Department had issued a penalty of Rs 60,000 on the Central Public Works Department (CPWD) after trees in south Delhi’s Thyagraj Nagar were found to be in poor condition, while one was also found to be uprooted.The fine was imposed recently after a site inspection had taken place at both Thyagraj Nagar and Netaji Nagar, where the proposed redevelopment project is planned to take place, with both construction sites found to be dumping debris around the trees.last_img read more

Hindu Hostel finally opens doors to eagerly waiting students

Hindu Hostel finally opens doors to eagerly waiting students

first_imgKolkata: The long awaited Hindu Hostel is finally ready for occupancy. A special secretary of the Education department visited the hostel on Monday morning and the necessary certificates that include occupancy, gas connection and fire, were issued.Earlier, state Education minister Partha Chatterjee had told the Assembly on Thursday that steps had been taken to open the hostel on Monday. It may be mentioned that due to agitation of the students protesting against the inordinate delay in handing over the hostel, the convocation was held at Nandan and not in the Presidency University premises. Also Read – Rain batters Kolkata, cripples normal lifeProfessor Anuradha Lohia, vice-chancellor of Presidency University, thanked all agencies engaged in the renovation of the century-old hostel. The boarders were temporarily put up at a hostel in Rajarhat. Partha Ranjan Das was the architect and renovation work had started three years ago. Eden Hindu Hostel was constructed in 1886 and was meant for the students of Presidency College, who came to the city from the districts. The building was built with the funds raised by Ashley Eden and the architect was W B Gwyther, while Rai Khetter Chundra Banerjee was the contractor. Now, the hostel has been thrown open to Muslim students as well. There are six blocks in the building. Also Read – Speeding Jaguar crashes into Mercedes car in Kolkata, 2 pedestrians killedThe building, which had not been repaired for ages, has now been given a thoroughly new look. The old ovens have been replaced by gas ovens. The roof of the hostel, which had been badly damaged, has been repaired as well. The hostel plays an important role in Bengal’s history. The alumni includes India’s first President Rajendra Prasad, Meghnad Saha, Sukhamoy Chakraborty and Rathin Sengupta. Many meritorious students who hailed from erstwhile East Bengal, came to study at Presidency College and used to stay at the hostel. It was here that Subhas Chandra Bose, a former student of Presidency College, had picked up a quarrel with Professor Otten and was expelled from the institution.last_img read more