PHOTOS Wilmington Librarys Latest Photography Exhibit

PHOTOS Wilmington Librarys Latest Photography Exhibit

first_imgLike Wilmington Apple on Facebook. Follow Wilmington Apple on Twitter. Follow Wilmington Apple on Instagram. Subscribe to Wilmington Apple’s daily email newsletter HERE. Got a comment, question, photo, press release, or news tip? Email wilmingtonapple@gmail.com.Thank You To Our Sponsor:Share this:TwitterFacebookLike this:Like Loading… RelatedHOT OFF THE PRESS: Read Wilmington Library’s Fall Adult Events BrochureIn “Community”Wilmington Library’s Touch-A-Truck Program Rescheduled To Monday, June 24In “Community”HOT OFF THE PRESS: Read Wilmington Library’s Fall Youth Events BrochureIn “Community” WILMINGTON, MA —  Poet, former computer engineer, and photographer Xiaoly Li has her photographs on display in the Wilmington Memorial Library’s Community Room through the end of December. Stop in to see her beautiful work!Click on each image for a larger view.last_img read more

Trump rabbi of attacked synagogue observe National Day of Prayer at White

Trump rabbi of attacked synagogue observe National Day of Prayer at White

first_img Jonathan Cain leads a musical number during a National Day of Prayer event in the White House Rose Garden on May 2, 2019, in Washington. RNS photo by Adelle M. Banks Pete Buttigieg: Religious left is ‘stirring’ August 29, 2019 Share This! Facebook Twitter Pinterest LinkedIn ReddIt Email Facebook Twitter Pinterest LinkedIn ReddIt Email,About the authorView All Posts Share This! News China is punishing Muslims for fasting. So US Muslims are fasting from China. Florida megachurch pastor Paula White — whose husband, Jonathan Cain, sang during the service backed by a Southern Baptist worship group — closed out the prayer section of the ceremony, asking the audience members to join hands despite their probably being “a little bit sweaty” on the hot, sunny day.“We declare every demonic network to be scattered right now,” she prayed. “We declare right now that there is a hedge of protection over our president, first lady, every assignment, the purpose they carry.”On the eve of the prayer day, Trump declared prayer to be “the most powerful thing there is” as he and first lady Melania Trump welcomed more than 100 faith leaders to dinner in the State Dining Room. Pence was a speaker at Washington’s Museum of the Bible that night at a National Day of Prayer Task Force dinner.In the annual White House statement on the National Day of Prayer, the president also highlighted the need to protect houses of worship from attacks.“The United States’ steadfast commitment to upholding religious freedom has ensured that people of different faiths can pray together and live in peace as fellow American citizens,” Trump said in the proclamation. “We have no tolerance for those who disrupt this peace, and we condemn all hate and violence, particularly in our places of worship.” By: Adelle M. Banks AMBankstw Facebook Twitter Pinterest LinkedIn ReddIt Email Adelle M. Banks AMBankstw By their tweets you will know them: The Democrats’ continuing God gap August 30, 2019 Share This! TagsChabad of Poway Donald Trump homepage featured Mike Pence National Day of Prayer Paula White Ralph Reed White House Yisroel Goldstein,You may also like Adelle M. Banks Adelle M. Banks, production editor and a national reporter, joined RNS in 1995. An award-winning journalist, she previously was the religion reporter at the Orlando Sentinel and a reporter at The Providence Journal and newspapers in the upstate New York communities of Syracuse and Binghamton.,Add Comment Click here to post a commentcenter_img Vice President Pence, with wife Karen, addresses a National Day of Prayer event in the White House Rose Garden on May 2, 2019, in Washington. RNS photo by Adelle M. Banks Share This! Facebook Twitter Pinterest LinkedIn ReddIt Email,WASHINGTON (RNS) — Among the guests at a White House ceremony marking the National Day of Prayer was Rabbi Yisroel Goldstein, leader of the California synagogue recently attacked by a gunman.Goldstein marveled that he survived the attack.“We cannot control what others do but we can control how we react,” said Goldstein, who sought to protect his congregation instead of running. “I should have been dead by now, based on the rule of statistics.”Goldstein, standing with his hands wrapped in blue bandages after a finger was blown off in the attack, tried to pivot beyond the tragedy to next steps. Some applauded as he suggested bringing a time of reverence to schoolchildren so they will know “every human being is created in God’s image” and they are valued.“Many have asked me, ‘Rabbi, where do we go from here?’” he said. “If something good can come out of this terrible, terrible horrific event, let us bring back a moment of silence to our public school system.” Facebook Twitter Pinterest LinkedIn ReddIt Email President Trump speaks a National Day of Prayer event in the White House Rose Garden on May 2, 2019, in Washington. RNS photo by Adelle M. Banks By: Adelle M. Banks AMBankstw By: Adelle M. Banks AMBankstw Share This! Opinion Anti-extremism program won’t stop hate, say Muslims who’ve seen its flaws August 30, 2019 The rabbi was among a group of leaders from different faiths who joined President Trump at the event.“As we unite on this day of prayer, we renew our resolve to protect communities of faith and to ensure that all people and all of our people can live and pray and worship in peace,” said Trump, drawing applause from Christians, Jews, Muslims and others at the midday interfaith gathering on Thursday (May 2).“In recent months, it’s been pretty tough. We’ve seen evil and hate-filled attacks on religious communities in the United States and all around the world.”Using a Yiddish term, Goldstein said he considered Trump “a mensch par excellence,” drawing applause for describing the chief executive as a person of honor.“Mr. President, when you called me, I was at home weeping,” the Orthodox rabbi in a big black hat told Trump. “You were the first person to begin my healing.”“Oh, wow,” said a man from the rows of chairs set up in the garden.Sister Joy Jones, General President of the Primary for The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-Day Saints, leads a prayer at the National Day of Prayer event in the White House Rose Garden on May 2, 2019, in Washington. RNS photo by Adelle M. BanksThe ceremony, marking the national observance created by Congress in 1952, lasted more than an hour. It featured remarks by Vice President Mike Pence as well as a former heroin addict who relied on prayer and religious leaders representing Catholic, Protestant, Jewish, Mormon, Muslim and Hindu beliefs.Pence, like Trump, cited the recent attacks on houses of worship across the globe and in the United States and said he would be visiting Louisiana on Friday after three historically black churches were burned there in recent months.The vice president, who opened the ceremony before the arrival of the president and first lady, described the White House as a place of prayer, with Trump having “a practice of opening every Cabinet meeting in prayer.”“I can assure you at a time when religious belief is often marginalized and even ridiculed, in this White House under this president we believe in prayer,” said Pence, drawing applause.Trump used the occasion to highlight new and old efforts he said he has pursued to enhance religious liberty for Americans.“Earlier this week, I took action to ensure that federal employees can take paid time off to observe religious holy days,” he said. “And just today we finalized new protections for conscience rights for physicians, pharmacists, nurses, teachers, students and faith-based charities.”President Trump listens as recovering opioid addict Ashley Evans addresses a National Day of Prayer event in the White House Rose Garden on May 2, 2019, in Washington. RNS photo by Adelle M. BanksThe announcement drew applause from the crowd but was criticized by others, including the Leadership Conference on Civil and Human Rights, which said the new rule from the Department of Health and Human Services will adversely affect patients who are denied care by health care workers citing moral or religious objections.“HHS’s final denial of care rule will substantially harm the health and well-being of many — in particular women and transgender patients,” said Vanita Gupta, president and CEO of the Leadership Conference, in a statement. “The government should protect all patients from discrimination, not make it easier for those in the health care system to discriminate.”Trump also pledged that his administration “will preserve the central role of faith-based adoption and foster care agencies to care for vulnerable children while following their deeply held beliefs.”He touched on other hot-button topics, declaring to cheers that “every child, born and unborn, is a sacred gift from God” and describing what he sees as an increased use of the greeting “Merry Christmas” in stores.Between citing his administration’s recent efforts to address criminal justice reform and expressing his regard for the country, Trump said “we think about God” in the midst of “witch hunts.”Despite the interfaith nature of the event, evangelical Christians seemed dominant among the speakers. A number of audience members sometimes raised their hands in the air in response to the prayers and music of the service.Faith & Freedom Coalition founder Ralph Reed prayed that Trump and his advisers would have “supernatural wisdom” and “a spirit of boldness and moral courage to do the right thing even in the presence of criticism and attacks.” News National Day of Prayer attendees raise their hands in praise, and to take pictures, during musical selections at the White House Rose Garden on May 2, 2019, in Washington. RNS photo by Adelle M. Banks Cancel replyYou must be logged in to post a comment.,‘Who’s doing Christianity right?’ At Taylor University, Pence invitation highlig … last_img read more

Democratic Sheriff Candidate Ed Gonzalez Calls For Overhaul Of Harris County Jail

Democratic Sheriff Candidate Ed Gonzalez Calls For Overhaul Of Harris County Jail

first_img 00:00 /01:14 To embed this piece of audio in your site, please use this code: Share X Ed Gonzalez for Sheriff websiteEd Gonzalez is the Democratic candidate for Sheriff of Harris County in the November 8th Election.Ed Gonzalez, the Democratic nominee for Harris County Sheriff, was a guest on Houston Matters. Gonzalez described the sheriff’s office as “stagnant” and “almost going backwards,” particularly in terms of the way it runs the Harris County Jail. He said overcrowding at the jail threatens the safety not only of inmates and guards but that of citizens throughout the county as well.“That’s why it worries me when we’re pulling money from patrols and investigations to simply plug in a hole on overtime costs in the jail, for example,” Gonzalez said, “because those investigators and those patrol officers are being overworked. It sometimes can lead to mistakes.”Houston Public Media’s Coverage of Election 2016Gonzalez admitted the problem predates the current administration under his opponent, Sheriff Ron Hickman. He said part of the solution might involve house arrest or citations rather than imprisonment for certain low-level offenses. But he also stressed the need to deal with the underlying causes of crime.“There’s three things that we’re addressing in law enforcement that do not have a law enforcement response, and that’s mental illness, poverty, and addiction. We’ve got to find community based solutions to that,” he said.Gonzalez argued that his experience as a three-term city council member and an 18-year veteran of the Houston Police Department makes him “uniquely suited” to help find those solutions.Click the play button below to listen to Houston Matters’ interview with Ed Gonzalez. Listenlast_img read more

Judge Newest Travel Ban Same Maladies As Previous Version

Judge Newest Travel Ban Same Maladies As Previous Version

first_img Share Jason RedmondPeople protest outside as the 9th U.S. Circuit Court of Appeals prepares to hear arguments on President Trump’s revised travel ban in Seattle on Monday.Just hours before President Donald Trump’s latest travel ban was to take full effect, a federal judge in Hawaii blocked the revised order, saying the policy has the same problems as a previous version.The revised order “suffers from precisely the same maladies as its predecessor,” U.S. District Judge Derrick Watson wrote in his ruling, which prevented the Trump administration from enforcing the travel ban set to go into effect early Wednesday.It was the third set of travel restrictions issued by the president to be thwarted, in whole or in part, by the courts.A federal judge in Maryland quickly followed suit with a similar ruling. U.S. District Judge Theodore Chuang also granted a nationwide preliminary injunction late Tuesday.Chuang’s ruling said the administration had “not shown that national security cannot be maintained without an unprecedented eight-country travel ban.”Watson’s Tuesday ruling said the new ban, like its predecessor, fails to show that nationality alone makes a person a greater security risk to the U.S.“The categorical restrictions on entire populations of men, women and children, based upon nationality, are a poor fit for the issues regarding the sharing of ‘public-safety and terrorism-related information’ that the president identifies,” Watson wrote.He said the ban is inconsistent in the way some countries are included or left out. For example, Iraq failed to meet the security benchmark but was omitted from the ban. Somalia met the information-sharing benchmark but was included.APDemonstrators agains the so-called travel ban in Seattle on May 15th, 2017.The ban, which was announced in September, applied to travelers from Chad, Iran, Libya, North Korea, Somalia, Syria and Yemen, along with some Venezuelan government officials and their families.The Trump administration said the ban was based on an assessment of each country’s security situation and willingness to share information with the U.S.White House spokeswoman Sarah Huckabee Sanders called the ruling “dangerously flawed” and said it “undercuts the president’s efforts to keep the American people safe.” The Justice Department said it will quickly appeal.The judge’s ruling applies only to the six Muslim-majority countries on the list. It does not affect the restrictions against North Korea or Venezuela, because Hawaii did not ask for that.The state of Hawaii challenged the ban on a set of mostly Muslim countries, arguing that the restrictions would separate families and undermine the recruiting of diverse college students.“This is the third time Hawaii has gone to court to stop President Trump from issuing a travel ban that discriminates against people based on their nation of origin or religion,” Hawaii Attorney General Doug Chin said in a statement. “Today is another victory for the rule of law.”Steve Helber | APProtesters hold signs and march in front of the State Capitol across the street from the US 4th Circuit Court of Appeals in Richmond, Va., Monday, May 8, 2017. The court will examine a ruling that blocks the administration from temporarily barring new visas for citizens of Iran, Libya, Somalia, Sudan, Syria and Yemen. It’s the first time an appeals court will hear arguments on the revised travel ban, which is likely destined for the U.S. Supreme Court.Watson, appointed to the bench by President Barack Obama, said the new restrictions ignore a federal appeals court ruling against Trump’s previous ban.The latest version “plainly discriminates based on nationality in the manner that the 9th Circuit has found antithetical to … the founding principles of this nation,” Watson wrote.Hawaii also argued the updated ban was a continuation of Trump’s campaign call for a ban on Muslims, despite the addition of two countries without a Muslim majority.Watson noted that Hawaii had argued Trump did not back down from that call, listing in the ruling a series of June tweets “in which (Trump) complained about how the Justice Department had submitted a “watered down, politically correct version’ to the Supreme Court.”Other courts that weighed the travel ban have cited Trump’s comments about banning Muslims, including the 4th U.S. Circuit Court of Appeals in Virginia and a federal judge in Maryland. Watson also referred to a Trump campaign statement in his previous ruling.“Judge Watson’s ruling makes clear that we are a nation of laws, no matter what this administration may try to do,” Hawaii’s U.S. Sen. Brian Schatz said in a statement. “There is a place here for peaceful immigrants from every corner of the world: Spain, Syria, Sudan, or Singapore. There is no place here for discrimination or xenophobia.”Watson found fault with what sorts of visitors are barred. For instance, all tourists and business travelers from Libya are excluded from the U.S., but student visitors were allowed.The judge said he would set an expedited hearing to determine whether the temporary restraining order blocking the ban should be extended. It comes as other courts weigh challenges to the ban.In Maryland, the American Civil Liberties Union and other groups are seeking to block the visa and entry restrictions. Washington state, Massachusetts, California, Oregon, New York and Maryland are challenging the order in front of the same federal judge in Seattle who struck down Trump’s initial ban in January.That ban — aimed mostly at Muslim-majority countries — led to chaos and confusion at airports nationwide and triggered several lawsuits, including one from Hawaii.When Trump revised the ban, Hawaii challenged that version, too, and Watson agreed it discriminated on the basis of nationality and religion. A subsequent U.S. Supreme Court ruling allowed the administration to partially reinstate restrictions against Iran, Libya, Somalia, Sudan, Syria and Yemen and against all refugees.Hawaii then successfully challenged the government’s definition of which relatives of people already living in the U.S. would be allowed into the country, and Watson ordered the list expanded.last_img read more

Augmented Reality Science Fiction or Reality w Video

Augmented Reality Science Fiction or Reality w Video

first_img(PhysOrg.com) — Computer graphics have come a long way since the birth of Atari Games over 30 years ago. Today, computer graphics seem very real and some day researchers will pull graphics out of your television or computer display and integrate them into real-world environments. By using Nvidia’s new Tegra platform, the game’s maps are generated by pointing the phones camera at a 2D drawing printout lying on a table. The end result shows a realistic 3D world with buildings popping up, as players move the real world around the game map placed on the table. Motion controlled devices for Nintendo Wii and Microsoft’s new Natal platform are already being used to enhance gamers experience. By using the Natal platform, as the control mechanism, body movements can easily be converted into game movements. The ultimate goal would be to merge game graphics with the real world. The day will come when video games are played outdoors and project into the real world around us. In the future augmented reality will have a more profound effect on the way in which we develop and interact with computers.Via: PCAuthority© 2009 PhysOrg.com This document is subject to copyright. Apart from any fair dealing for the purpose of private study or research, no part may be reproduced without the written permission. The content is provided for information purposes only. This new technology, called augmented reality or AR, will further disguise what’s real and what’s computer-generated by enhancing what we see, hear, feel and smell.Up until now AR has been used extensively in movies and been mostly confined to Hollywood. Today, it’s now possible to shoot augmented reality by using only a mobile phone.The video below demonstrates basic AR in action. The AR scene involves an AR shooter shooting at zombies and using skittles as bombs to blow up zombies. Security Alert: Beware of SMS Messages That Can Take Control of Your Phone Explore further Citation: Augmented Reality: Science Fiction or Reality? (w/ Video) (2009, July 7) retrieved 18 August 2019 from https://phys.org/news/2009-07-augmented-reality-science-fiction-video.htmllast_img read more

Stress in Childhood and Adulthood Have Combined Impact on Hormones and Health

first_imgThe researchers specifically wanted to understand howstressful events affect the brain’s stress-response system later in life. Is itthe total amount of stress experienced across the lifespan that matters? Or doesexposure to stress during sensitive periods of development, specifically in earlychildhood, have the biggest impact?   Young and colleagues wanted to investigate a thirdpossibility: Early childhood stress makes our stress-response system moresensitive to stressors that emerge later in life. For thestudy, Young and colleagues examined data from 90 individuals whowere part of a high-risk birth cohort participating in the Minnesota LongitudinalStudy of Risk and Adaptation. At age 37, the participants also provided daily cortisol dataover a 2-day period. They collected a saliva sample immediately when they wokeup and again 30 minutes and 1 hour later; they also took samples in theafternoon and before going to bed. They sent the saliva samples to a lab for cortisol-leveltesting. “What we find is that the amount of a person’s exposure toearly life stress plays an important role in the development of unhealthypatterns of cortisol release. However, this is only true if individuals alsoare experiencing higher levels of current stress, indicating that thecombination of higher early life stress and higher current life stress leads tothe most unhealthy cortisol profiles,” says psychological scientist Ethan Young,a researcher at the University of Minnesota. The researchers grouped participants’ LES scores into specificperiods: early childhood (1-5 years), middle childhood (Grades 1-6),adolescence (16 and 17 years), early adulthood (23-34 years), and current (37years). The researchers also investigated whether life stress inmiddle childhood, adolescence, and early adulthood were associated with adultcortisol patterns, and found no meaningful relationships. Young and colleagues note that cortisol is one part of thehuman stress-response system, and they hope to investigate how othercomponents, such as the microbiome in our gut, also play a role in long-termhealth outcomes. The researchers found that neither total life stress nor early childhood stress predicted cortisol level patterns at age 37. Rather, cortisol patterns depended on both early childhood stress and stress at age 37. Participants who experienced relatively low levels of stress in early childhood showed relatively similar cortisol patterns regardless of their stress level in adulthood. On the other hand, participants who had been exposed to relatively high levels of early childhood stress showed flatter daily cortisol patterns, but only if they also reported high levels of stress as adults. One of the ways that our brain responds to daily stressors isby releasing a hormone called cortisol — typically, our cortisol levels peak inthe morning and gradually decline throughout the day. But sometimes this systemcan become dysregulated, resulting in a flatter cortisol pattern that is associatedwith negative health outcomes. The researchers assessed data from the Life Events Schedule(LES), which surveys individuals’ stressful life events, including financialtrouble, relationship problems, and physical danger and mortality. Trained codersrate the level of disruption of each event on a scale from 0 to 3 to create anoverall score for that measurement period. The participants’ mothers completed theinterview when the participants were 12, 18, 30, 42, 48, 54, and 64 months old;when they were in Grades 1, 2, 3, and 6; and when they were 16 and 17 years old.The participants completed the LES themselves when they were 23, 26, 28, 32,34, and 37 years old. These findings suggest that early childhood may be aparticularly sensitive time in which stressful life events — such as thoserelated to trauma or poverty — can calibrate the brain’s stress-responsesystem, with health consequences that last into adulthood. Coauthors on the research include Allison K. Farrell, Elizabeth A. Carlson, Michelle M. Englund, Gregory E. Miller, Megan R. Gunnar, Glenn I. Roisman, Jeffry A. Simpson. Adults who report high levels of stress and who also hadstressful childhoods are most likely to show hormone patterns associated withnegative health outcomes, according to findings published in Psychological Science,a journal of the Association for PsychologicalScience. This project was supported by a NationalInstitute on Aging grant (No. R01 AG039453) awarded to J. A. Simpson, whichsupported the most recent assessments of the Minnesota Longitudinal Study ofRisk and Adaptation.last_img read more